Cloverland's Guidebook

Jenny
Cloverland's Guidebook

Sightseeing

This implausibly pretty promenade on the cliffs above the beach was landscaped in the mid-19th century. There’s a long lawn, interspersed with ornamental flowerbeds, cafes, the Leas Cliff Hall theatre, a bandstand and monuments like an remembrance arch to the First World War. Much of what you on the Leas was planned by Decimus Burton, the architect best known for its his work at Kew Gardens and London Zoo. You can catch the cliff lift (if it’s running) or take the Zig Zag Path down to the seafront, or pause at the terrace at the top and survey the Channel and the coast of France in the distance.
13 preporuka/e lokalaca
The Leas
13 preporuka/e lokalaca
This implausibly pretty promenade on the cliffs above the beach was landscaped in the mid-19th century. There’s a long lawn, interspersed with ornamental flowerbeds, cafes, the Leas Cliff Hall theatre, a bandstand and monuments like an remembrance arch to the First World War. Much of what you on the Leas was planned by Decimus Burton, the architect best known for its his work at Kew Gardens and London Zoo. You can catch the cliff lift (if it’s running) or take the Zig Zag Path down to the seafront, or pause at the terrace at the top and survey the Channel and the coast of France in the distance.
A couple of miles inland from Folkestone is the former RAF Hawkinge. In the summer of 1940 this was a key base in the Battle of Britain, fighting for control of British airspace, and was called into action many times later in the war. Since 1971 these huts and hangars have hosted the oldest and most detailed museum to cover the conflict. The museum has been supported by many WWII pilots who donated uniforms, medals, documents, photographs and other personal effects. There are also artefacts from some 700 crashed aircraft on display, as well as pieces relating to the German V-Weapons, autographs by pilots, full-sized Spitfire, Messerschmitt and Hurricane replicas and amazing accounts of life as a pilot.
10 preporuka/e lokalaca
Kent Battle of Britain Museum Trust
10 preporuka/e lokalaca
A couple of miles inland from Folkestone is the former RAF Hawkinge. In the summer of 1940 this was a key base in the Battle of Britain, fighting for control of British airspace, and was called into action many times later in the war. Since 1971 these huts and hangars have hosted the oldest and most detailed museum to cover the conflict. The museum has been supported by many WWII pilots who donated uniforms, medals, documents, photographs and other personal effects. There are also artefacts from some 700 crashed aircraft on display, as well as pieces relating to the German V-Weapons, autographs by pilots, full-sized Spitfire, Messerschmitt and Hurricane replicas and amazing accounts of life as a pilot.
West of the Lower Leas Coastal Park is the village of Sandgate, which became a part of Folkestone in 1934. On the water here is a long shingle beach, tracked by the promenade running several miles from Folkestone to Hythe. Out of season you can come and skim stones, breathe in the crisp sea air and watch the ferries and container ships passing by. In summer you can sunbathe, indulge in seaside treats like ice cream or fish and chips, hire a beach hut or gear up for activities like kayaking and sailing. Sandgate Beach is a Seaside Award winner and has been commended by the Marine Conservation Society, so is a safe place to swim if you can handle the temperatures.
Sandgate Beach
26 Radnor Cliff
West of the Lower Leas Coastal Park is the village of Sandgate, which became a part of Folkestone in 1934. On the water here is a long shingle beach, tracked by the promenade running several miles from Folkestone to Hythe. Out of season you can come and skim stones, breathe in the crisp sea air and watch the ferries and container ships passing by. In summer you can sunbathe, indulge in seaside treats like ice cream or fish and chips, hire a beach hut or gear up for activities like kayaking and sailing. Sandgate Beach is a Seaside Award winner and has been commended by the Marine Conservation Society, so is a safe place to swim if you can handle the temperatures.
Sharing Folkestone’s former town hall with the visitor information centre, this museum is somewhere to dive into the town’s absorbing history. Folkestone Museum has just been overhauled with help from the Heritage Lottery Fund and reopened in 2017. There are five main themes: Fashion, Frontline, Maritime, Natural and Ancient. “Fashion” recounts Folkestone’s evolution from low-key fishing village to chic Edwardian seaside resort, while “Frontline” documents the town’s role as the first line of defence for South East England. There are Roman artefacts and dinosaur fossils in “Ancient” and “Natural”, while “Maritime” explores Folkestone’s close ties to the sea, from fishing to smuggling and shipwrecks.
7 preporuka/e lokalaca
Folkestone Museum
1-2 Guildhall St
7 preporuka/e lokalaca
Sharing Folkestone’s former town hall with the visitor information centre, this museum is somewhere to dive into the town’s absorbing history. Folkestone Museum has just been overhauled with help from the Heritage Lottery Fund and reopened in 2017. There are five main themes: Fashion, Frontline, Maritime, Natural and Ancient. “Fashion” recounts Folkestone’s evolution from low-key fishing village to chic Edwardian seaside resort, while “Frontline” documents the town’s role as the first line of defence for South East England. There are Roman artefacts and dinosaur fossils in “Ancient” and “Natural”, while “Maritime” explores Folkestone’s close ties to the sea, from fishing to smuggling and shipwrecks.
Wedged just between The Stade on the harbour and that Country Park is a sandy beach that is a hit with families in summer. There’s no lack of facilities in this area should you get peckish or need to use a loo, while the sand is perfect for building sandcastles. At other times of the year Sunny Sands is a good destination for a walk. There’s a terrace at the west end with a picturesque view along the line of cliffs. Close by you’ll find the Folkestone Mermaid (2011), a life-sized bronze sculpture perched on the rocks like the famous Copenhagen Mermaid. The Folkestone equivalent is a realistic depiction of a woman, modelled on a local mother of two and looking out to the horizon as a comment on climate change and rising sea levels.
27 preporuka/e lokalaca
Sunny Sands
27 preporuka/e lokalaca
Wedged just between The Stade on the harbour and that Country Park is a sandy beach that is a hit with families in summer. There’s no lack of facilities in this area should you get peckish or need to use a loo, while the sand is perfect for building sandcastles. At other times of the year Sunny Sands is a good destination for a walk. There’s a terrace at the west end with a picturesque view along the line of cliffs. Close by you’ll find the Folkestone Mermaid (2011), a life-sized bronze sculpture perched on the rocks like the famous Copenhagen Mermaid. The Folkestone equivalent is a realistic depiction of a woman, modelled on a local mother of two and looking out to the horizon as a comment on climate change and rising sea levels.
A peaceful slice of the Kent Downs outside Hythe, Brockhill Country Park is on land that once belonged to a sprawling Norman manor. The park is mostly open grassland and meadows on a broad valley formed by the Brockhill Stream. There are two signposted trails, one around the park’s tree-lined central lake and another along the valley. Both of these join with the 163-mile Saxon Shore Way if you’d like to keep walking. In early spring there’s a sea of snowdrops in the meadows, while you should see white marbled butterflies on a sunny day in July. The park has a picnic area, while you can end your walk with a cup of tea and a chat at the Brockhill Cafe’s patio.
11 preporuka/e lokalaca
Brockhill Country Park
11 preporuka/e lokalaca
A peaceful slice of the Kent Downs outside Hythe, Brockhill Country Park is on land that once belonged to a sprawling Norman manor. The park is mostly open grassland and meadows on a broad valley formed by the Brockhill Stream. There are two signposted trails, one around the park’s tree-lined central lake and another along the valley. Both of these join with the 163-mile Saxon Shore Way if you’d like to keep walking. In early spring there’s a sea of snowdrops in the meadows, while you should see white marbled butterflies on a sunny day in July. The park has a picnic area, while you can end your walk with a cup of tea and a chat at the Brockhill Cafe’s patio.
Beginning at Seabrook, a western suburb of Folkestone, is a military construction from the Napoleonic era when the UK was expecting an invasion from France. Built as a defensive barrier, the Royal Military Canal runs 28 miles west to Cliff End near Hastings and was completed in 1809 after just four years of construction. The canal remains an unusual landmark and a picturesque walking route with level paths, lots of greenery and benches. In the build-up to the Second World War the canal’s ramparts still had a defensive use: Sound mirrors (a predecessor to radar) and pillboxes were constructed on the earthworks, and these add an extra layer of history to your walk.
15 preporuka/e lokalaca
Royal Military Canal
15 preporuka/e lokalaca
Beginning at Seabrook, a western suburb of Folkestone, is a military construction from the Napoleonic era when the UK was expecting an invasion from France. Built as a defensive barrier, the Royal Military Canal runs 28 miles west to Cliff End near Hastings and was completed in 1809 after just four years of construction. The canal remains an unusual landmark and a picturesque walking route with level paths, lots of greenery and benches. In the build-up to the Second World War the canal’s ramparts still had a defensive use: Sound mirrors (a predecessor to radar) and pillboxes were constructed on the earthworks, and these add an extra layer of history to your walk.
This 13.5-mile heritage line between Hythe and Dungeness was purpose-built as a passenger in the 1920s. The RH&DR is a light railway, with a 15-inch track gauge, which is even narrower than “narrow gauge”. Nearly all of the engines are from the 1920s and 1930s, pulling vintage coaches that date back to 1928. There are six stations on the railway, and the route passes through some of Kent’s most scenic landscapes. The western terminus is maybe most out of the ordinary. The Dungeness National Nature Reserve has an unending expanse of shingle, offering a habitat for a third of all the plants native to the UK. Real train enthusiasts can get hands-on with a “Drive a Steam Engine” experience on a half-day, one-day or two-day course.
66 preporuka/e lokalaca
Romney Hythe & Dymchurch Railway
2 Littlestone Road
66 preporuka/e lokalaca
This 13.5-mile heritage line between Hythe and Dungeness was purpose-built as a passenger in the 1920s. The RH&DR is a light railway, with a 15-inch track gauge, which is even narrower than “narrow gauge”. Nearly all of the engines are from the 1920s and 1930s, pulling vintage coaches that date back to 1928. There are six stations on the railway, and the route passes through some of Kent’s most scenic landscapes. The western terminus is maybe most out of the ordinary. The Dungeness National Nature Reserve has an unending expanse of shingle, offering a habitat for a third of all the plants native to the UK. Real train enthusiasts can get hands-on with a “Drive a Steam Engine” experience on a half-day, one-day or two-day course.
In 1784 the Folkestone seafront changed forever when a landslip created a new belt of land between the cliff and beach under the Leas. This was first landscaped in the 19th century, and from 2000 to 2006 the 27-acre Coastal Park took shape. This park has earned the Green Flag, the highest award for parks in the UK. A much-loved feature is the Zig Zag Path, wending its way from the Leas Cliff Hall to the park’s bandstand, through caves and with stirring coastal views at every hairpin turn. There are three main zones in the park: A formal zone, with newly planted pine avenues, flowerbeds and picnic sites; a fun zone, with the largest adventure playground in South East England and an amphitheatre; and finally a wild zone, which is a natural reserve protecting the unique habitat caused by the landslip.
49 preporuka/e lokalaca
Lower Leas Coastal Park
49 preporuka/e lokalaca
In 1784 the Folkestone seafront changed forever when a landslip created a new belt of land between the cliff and beach under the Leas. This was first landscaped in the 19th century, and from 2000 to 2006 the 27-acre Coastal Park took shape. This park has earned the Green Flag, the highest award for parks in the UK. A much-loved feature is the Zig Zag Path, wending its way from the Leas Cliff Hall to the park’s bandstand, through caves and with stirring coastal views at every hairpin turn. There are three main zones in the park: A formal zone, with newly planted pine avenues, flowerbeds and picnic sites; a fun zone, with the largest adventure playground in South East England and an amphitheatre; and finally a wild zone, which is a natural reserve protecting the unique habitat caused by the landslip.
One of many good reasons to make the 10-minute drive west to Hythe is to investigate this 11th-century Norman church, which contains one of only two ossuaries the UK. This is in the ambulatory, just below the chancel and dates to 1220. There are around 2,000 skulls and 8,000 thigh bones here, dating back as far as the 13th century and removed from the cemetery to make space for more burials. The ossuary has a spooky appeal, but there are other exciting details, like a pillar on the southern part of the nave inscribed with Medieval graffiti of ships. Go across the aisle to the north side and through an unlocked door there’s a preserved Norman arch using masonry recycled from Roman buildings.
St Leonards Church
3 Oak Walk
One of many good reasons to make the 10-minute drive west to Hythe is to investigate this 11th-century Norman church, which contains one of only two ossuaries the UK. This is in the ambulatory, just below the chancel and dates to 1220. There are around 2,000 skulls and 8,000 thigh bones here, dating back as far as the 13th century and removed from the cemetery to make space for more burials. The ossuary has a spooky appeal, but there are other exciting details, like a pillar on the southern part of the nave inscribed with Medieval graffiti of ships. Go across the aisle to the north side and through an unlocked door there’s a preserved Norman arch using masonry recycled from Roman buildings.
Port Lympne Hotel & Reserve offers exciting days out in Kent filled with discovery for the entire family. Set in 600 acres, and housing over 650 rare and endangered animals, Port Lympne offers a treat for everyone. Set within 15 acres of landscaped gardens in the beautiful Port Lympne Wild Animal Reserve, the Port Lympne Mansion Hotel features stunning views across the Romney Marsh, over the Kent Coast, and towards the English Channel. This unique property has free WiFi and free onsite parking. The historic Edwardian mansion house offers elegant rooms, each with a flat-screen TV, an iPod docking station, a seating area, and tea and coffee making facilities. The en-suite bath or shower rooms have bathrobes, complimentary toiletries, and a hairdryer. Some luxury suites boast a four-poster bed and all rooms have luxurious detailing and stylish furnishings. In the mornings, the Port Lympne Mansion House serves full English and continental breakfasts. Port Lympne Mansion Hotel has accommodated prestigious guests, including Sir Winston Churchill, Lawrence of Arabia, and Prince Edward. Guests can explore the Howletts Wild Animal Park, which is also within the grounds.
57 preporuka/e lokalaca
Port Lympne Hotel & Reserve
57 preporuka/e lokalaca
Port Lympne Hotel & Reserve offers exciting days out in Kent filled with discovery for the entire family. Set in 600 acres, and housing over 650 rare and endangered animals, Port Lympne offers a treat for everyone. Set within 15 acres of landscaped gardens in the beautiful Port Lympne Wild Animal Reserve, the Port Lympne Mansion Hotel features stunning views across the Romney Marsh, over the Kent Coast, and towards the English Channel. This unique property has free WiFi and free onsite parking. The historic Edwardian mansion house offers elegant rooms, each with a flat-screen TV, an iPod docking station, a seating area, and tea and coffee making facilities. The en-suite bath or shower rooms have bathrobes, complimentary toiletries, and a hairdryer. Some luxury suites boast a four-poster bed and all rooms have luxurious detailing and stylish furnishings. In the mornings, the Port Lympne Mansion House serves full English and continental breakfasts. Port Lympne Mansion Hotel has accommodated prestigious guests, including Sir Winston Churchill, Lawrence of Arabia, and Prince Edward. Guests can explore the Howletts Wild Animal Park, which is also within the grounds.

Food scene

In the 2000s Folkestone’s historic town centre began to rebrand itself as a cultural hotspot. The result is the Creative Quarter, home to galleries, artists’ studios and performance spaces, as well as shops, cafes and restaurants that all have their own personality. The Creative Foundation, which launched the initiative, also opened the Quarterhouse. An anchor for the Creative Quarter, this venue has live music, film screenings, comedy and plays. The Quarterhouse co-curates three festivals a year. For instance, SALT in September is a celebration of Folkestone’s sea and coastline. Also make sure to find out what’s on at Strange Cargo, a gallery in a former factory and warehouse.
21 preporuka/e lokalaca
The Creative Quarter
21 preporuka/e lokalaca
In the 2000s Folkestone’s historic town centre began to rebrand itself as a cultural hotspot. The result is the Creative Quarter, home to galleries, artists’ studios and performance spaces, as well as shops, cafes and restaurants that all have their own personality. The Creative Foundation, which launched the initiative, also opened the Quarterhouse. An anchor for the Creative Quarter, this venue has live music, film screenings, comedy and plays. The Quarterhouse co-curates three festivals a year. For instance, SALT in September is a celebration of Folkestone’s sea and coastline. Also make sure to find out what’s on at Strange Cargo, a gallery in a former factory and warehouse.
In the mid-19th century Folkestone’s harbour was dredged and screened by a long seawall that protects its south side. The Harbour Arm was hooked up to the Southeastern Railway’s London to Dover Line and had a ferry service to Boulogne. In the First World War, some ten million people passed through the harbour. Passenger numbers on cross-Channel ferries dwindled after the arrival of the Channel Tunnel in the 1990s. This meant that the old terminal, extending out to sea for several hundred metres, needed a new role. Since the 2010s this once disused structure has been brought back to life, becoming a promenade and summer dining destination, with street food stalls, live music and a handful of enticing semi-permanent eateries. Come for mezze, barbecue ribs, cockles or stone-baked pizzas, savour the view back to the town and its cliffs and watch movies and live sporting events at the Harbour Screen.
67 preporuka/e lokalaca
Old Folkestone Pier
67 preporuka/e lokalaca
In the mid-19th century Folkestone’s harbour was dredged and screened by a long seawall that protects its south side. The Harbour Arm was hooked up to the Southeastern Railway’s London to Dover Line and had a ferry service to Boulogne. In the First World War, some ten million people passed through the harbour. Passenger numbers on cross-Channel ferries dwindled after the arrival of the Channel Tunnel in the 1990s. This meant that the old terminal, extending out to sea for several hundred metres, needed a new role. Since the 2010s this once disused structure has been brought back to life, becoming a promenade and summer dining destination, with street food stalls, live music and a handful of enticing semi-permanent eateries. Come for mezze, barbecue ribs, cockles or stone-baked pizzas, savour the view back to the town and its cliffs and watch movies and live sporting events at the Harbour Screen.
Rocksalt restaurant & bar in Folkestone celebrates the finest local produce & the best the British Isles has to offer. Seasonal ingredients are expertly prepared to create modern and contemporary dishes, served in a relaxed, informal setting with panoramic harbour views.
77 preporuka/e lokalaca
Rocksalt
4-5 Fishmarket
77 preporuka/e lokalaca
Rocksalt restaurant & bar in Folkestone celebrates the finest local produce & the best the British Isles has to offer. Seasonal ingredients are expertly prepared to create modern and contemporary dishes, served in a relaxed, informal setting with panoramic harbour views.
Marco Pierre White’s (MPW) popular Steakhouse Bar & Grill is based at the Clifton Hotel in Folkestone. The Steakhouse Bar & Grill menu is exclusively curated by Marco himself and features signature steaks, timeless English and French classics and a comprehensive selection of premium cocktails. All dishes represent Marco’s ethos - classic dishes, simply cooked using the best locally sourced ingredients. The traditional Victorian style Clifton Hotel, Folkestone dates back to 1864 and offers spectacular views of the English Channel. Nestled in the centre of the famous Leas, its 80 bedrooms provide either stunning sea views or quaint garden sights.
8 preporuka/e lokalaca
Marco Pierre White Steakhouse Bar & Grill Folkestone
6 Clifton Gardens
8 preporuka/e lokalaca
Marco Pierre White’s (MPW) popular Steakhouse Bar & Grill is based at the Clifton Hotel in Folkestone. The Steakhouse Bar & Grill menu is exclusively curated by Marco himself and features signature steaks, timeless English and French classics and a comprehensive selection of premium cocktails. All dishes represent Marco’s ethos - classic dishes, simply cooked using the best locally sourced ingredients. The traditional Victorian style Clifton Hotel, Folkestone dates back to 1864 and offers spectacular views of the English Channel. Nestled in the centre of the famous Leas, its 80 bedrooms provide either stunning sea views or quaint garden sights.
A local village pub, Serving a good variety of Ales,Beers, Wines & Ciders along with a great selection of home cooked food. All tastes catered for, including Vegetarian, Vegan & Specialist Dietary requirements. Fantastic weekly offers e.g Senior Citizens, Steak Nights & Sunday Carvery Regular entertainment including Quiz Nights & Live Music.
Coach & Horses
A local village pub, Serving a good variety of Ales,Beers, Wines & Ciders along with a great selection of home cooked food. All tastes catered for, including Vegetarian, Vegan & Specialist Dietary requirements. Fantastic weekly offers e.g Senior Citizens, Steak Nights & Sunday Carvery Regular entertainment including Quiz Nights & Live Music.
Harriet and her team would like to welcome you to The Gatekeeper Inn, a family-run pub set in the heart of the scenic village of Etchinghill, Kent. They are a dog-friendly pub and welcome you to bring along your furry companions, their resident dog, Max would love to see some friendly faces! They are also a family-friendly pub and welcome children of all ages when accompanied by an adult.
The Gatekeeper
Harriet and her team would like to welcome you to The Gatekeeper Inn, a family-run pub set in the heart of the scenic village of Etchinghill, Kent. They are a dog-friendly pub and welcome you to bring along your furry companions, their resident dog, Max would love to see some friendly faces! They are also a family-friendly pub and welcome children of all ages when accompanied by an adult.

City advice

In the quaint regenerated streets of Folkestone, you'll discover cutting-edge art in its unique Creative Quarter, which houses over 100 artistic enterprises within its cobbled centre. Explore pastel-painted studio-galleries, and indulge in quirky stores, laid-back bars and chic eateries. The mile-long cliff-top promenade of The Leas is just a short stroll away, offering sea views to France, and a ride to the Lower Leas Coastal Park where you can enjoy a picnic or BBQ on the beach; or head to the Folkestone Harbour Arm for an eclectic mix of food, drink and entertainment. Be sure to try Rocksalt for super-fresh fish and al-fresco dining with superb harbour views, or Marco Pierre White Steakhouse Bar and Grill for classic French and English cuisine, with a side of Channel views from the Clifton Hotel. Eurotunnel Le Shuttle also brings France closer too, with Folkestone just 35 minutes away from Calais. The south Kent coast has long protected the realm. Hythe, New Romney, Sandwich, Dover and Hastings united in the 11th-century as the original Cinque Ports. Henry VIII built diminutive Sandgate Castle in 1539. A chain of sturdy Martello Towers, stretching from Folkestone to Sussex, went up during the Napoleonic wars, while the planes, hangars and artefacts of Folkestone's Kent Battle of Britain Museum, and the heroic story re-told at the Battle of Britain Memorial speak eloquently of the aircrews that defended the skies. History is tangible too in Hythe Kent, from 10th century St Leonard's Church with its skull-packed ossuary, to the family-run stores and antique shops all over town. While the Hythe Bay Seafood Restaurant can always be relied upon for just-caught fish and spectacular sea views. The Romney, Hythe and Dymchurch Railway offers a scenic, marsh-side, steam-powered puff from Hythe, through New Romney, to Dungeness. The Napoleonic-era Royal Military Canal stretches for 28 miles, with shorter towpath cycle and walking routes fanning out from Hythe. Nearby Port Lympne Hotel & Reserve and Howletts Wild Animal Park are alive with lions, tigers, gorillas and meerkats to provide a truly wild day out. You can even bed down (almost) beside the beasts through the array of short breaks opportunities. With huge skies and clear air, Romney Marsh offers freedom, space and a place to think. Its 100 square miles of unspoilt countryside takes in woodland, wetlands and sand and shingle shores. Pay a visit to the Romney Marsh Visitor Centre for information about the history and wildlife of this unique landscape, as well as tips on other things to see and do. Cinque Port towns New Romney and Lydd supply compelling stories and smugglers' tales, while the huge RSPB nature reserve at Dungeness delivers birdlife at its most magnificent. Tee off on the beautiful Littlestone Golf Club's links courses for sensational views across to the English Channel. Prospect Cottage - the home of outspoken author and film-maker Derek Jarman - provides a unique insight into writing, living and gardening - ideal for outdoor enthusiasts. Be sure to visit Elham Valley, nestled midway between Canterbury and Folkestone, within the Kent Downs Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, providing a multitude of woodland walks and country pubs.
41 preporuka/e lokalaca
Folkestone
41 preporuka/e lokalaca
In the quaint regenerated streets of Folkestone, you'll discover cutting-edge art in its unique Creative Quarter, which houses over 100 artistic enterprises within its cobbled centre. Explore pastel-painted studio-galleries, and indulge in quirky stores, laid-back bars and chic eateries. The mile-long cliff-top promenade of The Leas is just a short stroll away, offering sea views to France, and a ride to the Lower Leas Coastal Park where you can enjoy a picnic or BBQ on the beach; or head to the Folkestone Harbour Arm for an eclectic mix of food, drink and entertainment. Be sure to try Rocksalt for super-fresh fish and al-fresco dining with superb harbour views, or Marco Pierre White Steakhouse Bar and Grill for classic French and English cuisine, with a side of Channel views from the Clifton Hotel. Eurotunnel Le Shuttle also brings France closer too, with Folkestone just 35 minutes away from Calais. The south Kent coast has long protected the realm. Hythe, New Romney, Sandwich, Dover and Hastings united in the 11th-century as the original Cinque Ports. Henry VIII built diminutive Sandgate Castle in 1539. A chain of sturdy Martello Towers, stretching from Folkestone to Sussex, went up during the Napoleonic wars, while the planes, hangars and artefacts of Folkestone's Kent Battle of Britain Museum, and the heroic story re-told at the Battle of Britain Memorial speak eloquently of the aircrews that defended the skies. History is tangible too in Hythe Kent, from 10th century St Leonard's Church with its skull-packed ossuary, to the family-run stores and antique shops all over town. While the Hythe Bay Seafood Restaurant can always be relied upon for just-caught fish and spectacular sea views. The Romney, Hythe and Dymchurch Railway offers a scenic, marsh-side, steam-powered puff from Hythe, through New Romney, to Dungeness. The Napoleonic-era Royal Military Canal stretches for 28 miles, with shorter towpath cycle and walking routes fanning out from Hythe. Nearby Port Lympne Hotel & Reserve and Howletts Wild Animal Park are alive with lions, tigers, gorillas and meerkats to provide a truly wild day out. You can even bed down (almost) beside the beasts through the array of short breaks opportunities. With huge skies and clear air, Romney Marsh offers freedom, space and a place to think. Its 100 square miles of unspoilt countryside takes in woodland, wetlands and sand and shingle shores. Pay a visit to the Romney Marsh Visitor Centre for information about the history and wildlife of this unique landscape, as well as tips on other things to see and do. Cinque Port towns New Romney and Lydd supply compelling stories and smugglers' tales, while the huge RSPB nature reserve at Dungeness delivers birdlife at its most magnificent. Tee off on the beautiful Littlestone Golf Club's links courses for sensational views across to the English Channel. Prospect Cottage - the home of outspoken author and film-maker Derek Jarman - provides a unique insight into writing, living and gardening - ideal for outdoor enthusiasts. Be sure to visit Elham Valley, nestled midway between Canterbury and Folkestone, within the Kent Downs Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, providing a multitude of woodland walks and country pubs.

Neighbourhoods

Etchinghill Golf has to be seen to be believed. Set amidst 200 acres of rolling countryside and breathtaking rugged hills against the backdrop of the Elham Valley. With one 18-hole, a 9-hole course with two sets of tees, a par 3 academy course and a foot golf course Etchinghill Golf has something for everyone! The 6,101 yard Leas Course is Etchinghill’s main eighteen hole golf course. Stretching across the beautiful Kentish countryside, it poses a fantastic challenge to golfers of all abilities. The magnificent Elham Valley lends its name to our versatile Valley Course which is made up of nine holes played from multiple tee positions to give the option of nine or eighteen holes. The par three Academy Course is popular with families and beginners alike.
Etchinghill Golf Club
Etchinghill Golf has to be seen to be believed. Set amidst 200 acres of rolling countryside and breathtaking rugged hills against the backdrop of the Elham Valley. With one 18-hole, a 9-hole course with two sets of tees, a par 3 academy course and a foot golf course Etchinghill Golf has something for everyone! The 6,101 yard Leas Course is Etchinghill’s main eighteen hole golf course. Stretching across the beautiful Kentish countryside, it poses a fantastic challenge to golfers of all abilities. The magnificent Elham Valley lends its name to our versatile Valley Course which is made up of nine holes played from multiple tee positions to give the option of nine or eighteen holes. The par three Academy Course is popular with families and beginners alike.
Canterbury is famed for its splendid cathedral and atmospheric medieval streets. A lively and multinational student population adds a more youthful element, and no doubt helps to sustain a good selection of attractive pubs and a healthy café scene. The Great Stour River, which passes through various parts of the city, provides a scenic background – especially when complemented by charming old buildings and beautiful green spaces. More bustle is found on the city’s shopping streets, where the selection ranges from department stores in Whitefriars to independent artisan shops in the King’s Mile. Away from the city centre, Canterbury is surrounded by storied countryside and charming villages.
214 preporuka/e lokalaca
Canterbury
214 preporuka/e lokalaca
Canterbury is famed for its splendid cathedral and atmospheric medieval streets. A lively and multinational student population adds a more youthful element, and no doubt helps to sustain a good selection of attractive pubs and a healthy café scene. The Great Stour River, which passes through various parts of the city, provides a scenic background – especially when complemented by charming old buildings and beautiful green spaces. More bustle is found on the city’s shopping streets, where the selection ranges from department stores in Whitefriars to independent artisan shops in the King’s Mile. Away from the city centre, Canterbury is surrounded by storied countryside and charming villages.
The Elham Valley Way leads from the internationally renowned cathedral city of Canterbury, down to the popular coastal town of Hythe, taking walkers through enchanting countryside and the Kent Downs Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. The ancient woods, classified as dating from before the 17th century, are carpeted with the flowers of bluebells, anemones and wild garlic in spring and turn spectacularly russet, orange and gold in autumn. Displays of spring blossom are also a feature of the many orchards near Canterbury, although it is said that the fine displays on the newer, shorter varieties of trees are not as dramatic as those found in traditional orchards. Many of these areas of woodland may also include more recent plantings. In the past, the woods were used in many local industries including building, charcoal production and bark for tanning in the leather industry. Coppicing, the practice of cutting down trees and allowing new stems to form for fencing and posts, is still common throughout the area.
Elham
The Elham Valley Way leads from the internationally renowned cathedral city of Canterbury, down to the popular coastal town of Hythe, taking walkers through enchanting countryside and the Kent Downs Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. The ancient woods, classified as dating from before the 17th century, are carpeted with the flowers of bluebells, anemones and wild garlic in spring and turn spectacularly russet, orange and gold in autumn. Displays of spring blossom are also a feature of the many orchards near Canterbury, although it is said that the fine displays on the newer, shorter varieties of trees are not as dramatic as those found in traditional orchards. Many of these areas of woodland may also include more recent plantings. In the past, the woods were used in many local industries including building, charcoal production and bark for tanning in the leather industry. Coppicing, the practice of cutting down trees and allowing new stems to form for fencing and posts, is still common throughout the area.