Guide to.....

Daniel
Guide to.....

Best restaurants

Best eateries in Folkestone. Most are within easy walking distance of the apartment.
Excellent seafood, top chef. Located in the harbour. 20 mins walk.
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Rocksalt
4-5 Fishmarket
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Excellent seafood, top chef. Located in the harbour. 20 mins walk.
Michelin star restaurant, about a 15 minute drive to Hythe.
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Hide and Fox Restaurant
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Michelin star restaurant, about a 15 minute drive to Hythe.
Excellent food and wine. Located in the town centre. 15 mins walk.
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Folkestone Wine Company
5 Church St
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Excellent food and wine. Located in the town centre. 15 mins walk.
Excellent food, very friendly service. 10 mins walk.
Sotirios Bar & Restaurant
103 Coast Dr
Excellent food, very friendly service. 10 mins walk.
Spanish tapas located on the Old High Street. 15 mins walk.
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EL CORTADOR Tapas Bar
41 The Old High St
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Spanish tapas located on the Old High Street. 15 mins walk.
Steakhouse located in the West End. 12 mins walk.
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Marco Pierre White Steakhouse Bar & Grill Folkestone
6 Clifton Gardens
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Steakhouse located in the West End. 12 mins walk.
Good selection of Asian good, located in the town centre. 15 mins walk.
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Market Square
19-21 Market Pl
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Good selection of Asian good, located in the town centre. 15 mins walk.
Good pub food located close to the apartment in Bouverie Village. 10 mins walk.
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The Radnor Arms Old Bouverie
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Good pub food located close to the apartment in Bouverie Village. 10 mins walk.
Good Turkish food, town centre. 15 mins walk.
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Aspendos Restaurant
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Good Turkish food, town centre. 15 mins walk.
Good quality pizza restaurant, town centre. 15 mins walk.
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Luben's Pizza
24 Rendezvous St
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Good quality pizza restaurant, town centre. 15 mins walk.
Asian food, very close to the apartment in Bouverie Village. 10 mins walk.
Cocomee
2 Castle Hill Avenue
Asian food, very close to the apartment in Bouverie Village. 10 mins walk.
Best curry house in Folkestone. BYOB, located near the harbour. 20 mins walk.
Curry Garden
54 Tontine Street
Best curry house in Folkestone. BYOB, located near the harbour. 20 mins walk.
The restaurant offers an authentic Nepalese cuisine based on home cooking and serves only freshly cooked produce as food is cooked only after receiving the order, therefore the serving time can be slightly longer then in some other places. Annapurna in Folkestone has been revealed as the top rated place to eat in the county on TripAdvisor.
Annapurna Restaurant
15 Cheriton Place
The restaurant offers an authentic Nepalese cuisine based on home cooking and serves only freshly cooked produce as food is cooked only after receiving the order, therefore the serving time can be slightly longer then in some other places. Annapurna in Folkestone has been revealed as the top rated place to eat in the county on TripAdvisor.
The restaurant offers an Indian fusion menu and is also a wine bar. It is a sister restaurant of Copper and Spices Folkestone & Coppers, in Hythe. Its philosophy is to create buzz by bringing the fusion to diner's normal curry and bringing local fresh ingredients to people's plates. It is vegetarian friendly and also offers vegan and gluten free options.
Holy Pundit. Spicy Cafe And Wine Bar @ Imperial
The restaurant offers an Indian fusion menu and is also a wine bar. It is a sister restaurant of Copper and Spices Folkestone & Coppers, in Hythe. Its philosophy is to create buzz by bringing the fusion to diner's normal curry and bringing local fresh ingredients to people's plates. It is vegetarian friendly and also offers vegan and gluten free options.
Currently celebrating its 900th year the castle was once a palace used by Henry VIII and his first wife Catherine of Aragon. It offers heritage, history, stunning grounds and adventure play grounds for children to burn off some energy. It received 62% five star reviews of a total 4403 reviews.
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Marley's Folkestone
26-30 The Old High St
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Currently celebrating its 900th year the castle was once a palace used by Henry VIII and his first wife Catherine of Aragon. It offers heritage, history, stunning grounds and adventure play grounds for children to burn off some energy. It received 62% five star reviews of a total 4403 reviews.
This 700-year-old tearoom in New Romney has done well to receive 185 excellent reviews out of a possible 217 on TripAdvisor. Cream and vintage teas are popular there, which can be enjoyed in a small coffee lounge or a courtyard garden. Sandwiches, paninis and jacket potatoes are also served.
Deblyns
This 700-year-old tearoom in New Romney has done well to receive 185 excellent reviews out of a possible 217 on TripAdvisor. Cream and vintage teas are popular there, which can be enjoyed in a small coffee lounge or a courtyard garden. Sandwiches, paninis and jacket potatoes are also served.
Coppers Spice Cafe and Wine bar in Hythe is yet another Indian fusion restaurant that makes it high on the list. They aim to create a buzz with their flavours by bringing a new take on your usual curry dishes and bringing fresh local ingredients to the table. A recent review claimed it was the best Indian they had ever experienced.
Coppers
26 Prospect Rd
Coppers Spice Cafe and Wine bar in Hythe is yet another Indian fusion restaurant that makes it high on the list. They aim to create a buzz with their flavours by bringing a new take on your usual curry dishes and bringing fresh local ingredients to the table. A recent review claimed it was the best Indian they had ever experienced.

Pubs

A selection of pubs in and around Folkestone. Most you can walk to, others you will need to drive to but all within half an hour away.
Great views across the channel and Folkestone, champaign and light snacks, located in the harbour. 25 mins walk.
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Lighthouse Champagne Bar
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Great views across the channel and Folkestone, champaign and light snacks, located in the harbour. 25 mins walk.
Bar in the West End by the Leas. Nice garden for sitting outsideif the weather is nice. 15 mins walk.
Skuba Bar and Bistro
2 Langhorne Gardens
Bar in the West End by the Leas. Nice garden for sitting outsideif the weather is nice. 15 mins walk.
Classic pub, nice decor and garden in the back. Town centre. 15 mins walk.
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The Pullman Folkestone
9 Church St
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Classic pub, nice decor and garden in the back. Town centre. 15 mins walk.
Traditional pub located in Sandgate. Good sea views. 15 minute walk to Sandgate.
The Ship Inn
23 The Stade
Traditional pub located in Sandgate. Good sea views. 15 minute walk to Sandgate.
Our local Wetheespoons, located in the town centre. 15 mins walk.
The Samuel Peto - Wetherspoons
Our local Wetheespoons, located in the town centre. 15 mins walk.
Very old and tradional pub located in the historic Bayle, near the town centre. Good selection of beers. 15 mins walk.
British Lion
8-10 The Bayle
Very old and tradional pub located in the historic Bayle, near the town centre. Good selection of beers. 15 mins walk.
Where: The Old High Street, Folkestone, CT20 1RL What : Kipps' Alehouse follows the general principle of a micro-pub, serving real ale directly from the cask. Alehouse located at the top of the Old High Street. Distance: 15 minute walk.
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Kipps' Alehouse
8 The Old High Street
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Where: The Old High Street, Folkestone, CT20 1RL What : Kipps' Alehouse follows the general principle of a micro-pub, serving real ale directly from the cask. Alehouse located at the top of the Old High Street. Distance: 15 minute walk.
Traditional country pub set in the Kent Downs. High quality. Excellent food anddining. 20 mins drive.
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The Tiger Inn
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Traditional country pub set in the Kent Downs. High quality. Excellent food anddining. 20 mins drive.
Traditional country pub. 15 mins drive.
The Drum Inn
Traditional country pub. 15 mins drive.
Proper local pub with great views across the harbour. Good for Sky Sports. Does not allow children inside pub. 20 mins walk.
The Mariner
16 The Stade
Proper local pub with great views across the harbour. Good for Sky Sports. Does not allow children inside pub. 20 mins walk.
Decent local pub near the harbour. Good value food. Nice terrace garden to sit out in the sun. 15 mins walk.
The Lifeboat
42 North Street
Decent local pub near the harbour. Good value food. Nice terrace garden to sit out in the sun. 15 mins walk.
Folkestones' very own micro brewery located in Bouverie Village, a 7 minute walk. Good selection of craft beers.
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The Bouverie Tap
45 Bouverie Rd W
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Folkestones' very own micro brewery located in Bouverie Village, a 7 minute walk. Good selection of craft beers.

Sightseeing

A selection of local places to visit for a day out.
Lots of independent street food and bars. Great views of the channel and Folkestone. 25 mins walk. The place to be' is what it says on the website, and based on the reviews most people agree. The restored harbour arm is a beautiful promenade out to sea with spectacular views of the White Cliffs and glimpses of France. It is fast becoming the centre for food, drink and entertainment, with almost 30 independent food and drink vendors, offering everything from simple seafood dishes to burritos and pizza. Here is what some visitors have to say: "What a change, we visited this area and was amazed how it has changed over the past few years." "When in Folkestone, this is a nice area to wander around, lots to see, and also good to sit and watch the world go by." "Nice to look over to the "White Cliffs of Dover" or out to sea and viewing the cross channel ferries now departing from Dover. The "Arm" is such a good , and unexpected innovation."
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Old Folkestone Pier
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Lots of independent street food and bars. Great views of the channel and Folkestone. 25 mins walk. The place to be' is what it says on the website, and based on the reviews most people agree. The restored harbour arm is a beautiful promenade out to sea with spectacular views of the White Cliffs and glimpses of France. It is fast becoming the centre for food, drink and entertainment, with almost 30 independent food and drink vendors, offering everything from simple seafood dishes to burritos and pizza. Here is what some visitors have to say: "What a change, we visited this area and was amazed how it has changed over the past few years." "When in Folkestone, this is a nice area to wander around, lots to see, and also good to sit and watch the world go by." "Nice to look over to the "White Cliffs of Dover" or out to sea and viewing the cross channel ferries now departing from Dover. The "Arm" is such a good , and unexpected innovation."
Classic seaside promenade with long stretches of grass. Amazing views across the English Channel. 3 mins walk. The Leas is Folkestone's popular and unique promenade. The mile long stretch along the clifftop offers views across the channel to France, and it set against a backdrop of beautiful Edwardian buildings. There is an ornate Victorian bandstand and lovely wide lawns, flower beds and hanging baskets, adding to the appeal and the old promenade aesthetic. Here is what recent visitors have to say: "Loved this walk along the sea, lots of different levels you can access to get to the stony shore. Well worth the walk." "The original buildings and bandstand are still there adding to the character. It is a reminder of how great this town used to be." "Quiet, refined and interesting area of Folkestone, lots of history in the huge Edwardian buildings of the Metropole and the Grand."
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The Leas
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Classic seaside promenade with long stretches of grass. Amazing views across the English Channel. 3 mins walk. The Leas is Folkestone's popular and unique promenade. The mile long stretch along the clifftop offers views across the channel to France, and it set against a backdrop of beautiful Edwardian buildings. There is an ornate Victorian bandstand and lovely wide lawns, flower beds and hanging baskets, adding to the appeal and the old promenade aesthetic. Here is what recent visitors have to say: "Loved this walk along the sea, lots of different levels you can access to get to the stony shore. Well worth the walk." "The original buildings and bandstand are still there adding to the character. It is a reminder of how great this town used to be." "Quiet, refined and interesting area of Folkestone, lots of history in the huge Edwardian buildings of the Metropole and the Grand."
Popular quaint high street, pubs, coffee shops, antique shops. Sandgate has been ranked as the UKs most popular Airbnb location to visit. 10 mins walk.
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Sandgate
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Popular quaint high street, pubs, coffee shops, antique shops. Sandgate has been ranked as the UKs most popular Airbnb location to visit. 10 mins walk.
Large zoo with safari animals. About a 20 minute drive.
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Port Lympne Hotel & Reserve
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Large zoo with safari animals. About a 20 minute drive.
Large sandy beach on the Sussex border, about 45 minute drive. Gets very busy on hot sunny days.
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Camber Sands
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Large sandy beach on the Sussex border, about 45 minute drive. Gets very busy on hot sunny days.
Picturesque town packed full of history. Quant cobbled streets. About a 45 minute drive.
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Rye
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Picturesque town packed full of history. Quant cobbled streets. About a 45 minute drive.
The Royal Military Canal in Hythe Originally dug to guard the area against the threat of invasion, today the canal is surrounded by beautiful greenery rich with history and heritage and full of flowers in spring. It is a peaceful spot for walking or fishing, or just stopping for a picnic. It received 63% five star reviews of a total 31 reviews.
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Royal Military Canal
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The Royal Military Canal in Hythe Originally dug to guard the area against the threat of invasion, today the canal is surrounded by beautiful greenery rich with history and heritage and full of flowers in spring. It is a peaceful spot for walking or fishing, or just stopping for a picnic. It received 63% five star reviews of a total 31 reviews.
Currently celebrating its 900th year the castle was once a palace used by Henry VIII and his first wife Catherine of Aragon. It offers heritage, history, stunning grounds and adventure play grounds for children to burn off some energy. It received 62% five star reviews of a total 4403 reviews.
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Leeds Castle
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Currently celebrating its 900th year the castle was once a palace used by Henry VIII and his first wife Catherine of Aragon. It offers heritage, history, stunning grounds and adventure play grounds for children to burn off some energy. It received 62% five star reviews of a total 4403 reviews.

Kent Heritage Coast

Kent's Heritage Coast has been named as one of the best places to visit in the world, beating Puerto Rico and Vancouver Island. The section of the county's coastline is fourth on a list of best regions to visit in 2022 by Lonely Planet, only beaten by locations in Iceland, the USA and China. Recognising Kent’s Heritage Coast’s unique combination of history, heritage and iconic natural landscapes, Lonely Planet have given our glorious coastline their official stamp of approval as the only UK destination to feature within this year’s illustrious round-up. Already recognised as an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, Kent’s Heritage Coast is home to stunning sandy beaches, iconic chalk faces, a thriving cultural and creative scene, heritage hotspots, and an exciting, rolling programme of events.
The famous White Cliffs of Dover, a central part of the Kent Heritage Coast. Recently voted by Lonely Planet as the 4th best place to visit...in the world! 15 mins drive.
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White Cliffs of Dover
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The famous White Cliffs of Dover, a central part of the Kent Heritage Coast. Recently voted by Lonely Planet as the 4th best place to visit...in the world! 15 mins drive.
Experience Folkestone's site-specific artworks Encountering contemporary art, whether you mean to or not, is becoming a quintessential part of the Kent coast experience. Since 2008, Folkestone Triennial has seen new site-specific artworks by high profile and international artists appear throughout the seaside town every three years (a pandemic-related delay in 2020 aside). Each edition also leaves behind some permanent works and, as a result, Folkestone now hosts the UK’s largest contemporary outdoor art exhibition all year round. The best bit – it’s free to visit.   There are more than 70 permanent Folkestone Artworks to be spotted – from sculptures and art objects, including Antony Gormley figures and Tracey Emin’s bronze-cast Baby Things to seaside pavilions, graphically-adorned beach huts, and a morse code message from Yoko Ono. The artworks are widely dispersed and you’ll never see them all in a day, so follow one of the suggested walking routes from Creative Folkestone – or simply keep your eyes peeled.
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The Creative Quarter
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Experience Folkestone's site-specific artworks Encountering contemporary art, whether you mean to or not, is becoming a quintessential part of the Kent coast experience. Since 2008, Folkestone Triennial has seen new site-specific artworks by high profile and international artists appear throughout the seaside town every three years (a pandemic-related delay in 2020 aside). Each edition also leaves behind some permanent works and, as a result, Folkestone now hosts the UK’s largest contemporary outdoor art exhibition all year round. The best bit – it’s free to visit.   There are more than 70 permanent Folkestone Artworks to be spotted – from sculptures and art objects, including Antony Gormley figures and Tracey Emin’s bronze-cast Baby Things to seaside pavilions, graphically-adorned beach huts, and a morse code message from Yoko Ono. The artworks are widely dispersed and you’ll never see them all in a day, so follow one of the suggested walking routes from Creative Folkestone – or simply keep your eyes peeled.
Complete the Cathedral-to-Coast cycle ride  Those with two wheels and some stamina can immerse themselves in Kent's highlights on a 50-mile (80-km) circular Cathedral-to-Coast cycle ride, linking Canterbury, Dover, and Folkestone.  In Canterbury expect to be moved by the scale and serenity of its vast cathedral, whether you share the Christian faith or not. This medieval pilgrimage site still pulls in nearly a million visitors annually to its dizzyingly high-ceilinged, stained glass-adorned interior. From there, the full cycle route follows part of the North Downs Way through rolling countryside, pretty villages, and a nature reserve near Elham. As you approach the Heritage Coast you'll be rewarded with spectacular sea views.  Alternatively, choose just one section of the cycle route, such as the 17 miles (27km) from Canterbury to Folkestone. The area is well-served by train stations, so you can continue your journey by rail.
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Canterbury Cathedral
11 The Precincts
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Complete the Cathedral-to-Coast cycle ride  Those with two wheels and some stamina can immerse themselves in Kent's highlights on a 50-mile (80-km) circular Cathedral-to-Coast cycle ride, linking Canterbury, Dover, and Folkestone.  In Canterbury expect to be moved by the scale and serenity of its vast cathedral, whether you share the Christian faith or not. This medieval pilgrimage site still pulls in nearly a million visitors annually to its dizzyingly high-ceilinged, stained glass-adorned interior. From there, the full cycle route follows part of the North Downs Way through rolling countryside, pretty villages, and a nature reserve near Elham. As you approach the Heritage Coast you'll be rewarded with spectacular sea views.  Alternatively, choose just one section of the cycle route, such as the 17 miles (27km) from Canterbury to Folkestone. The area is well-served by train stations, so you can continue your journey by rail.
Explore Lower Leas Coastal Park  You can easily lose a whole day with children in Folkestone’s Lower Leas Coastal Park, which has a transportive "is-this-really-the-UK?" quality thanks in part to the dramatic botanical architecture of its well-maintained gardens, with many Mediterranean and non-native plants.  Much of the park has sea views, while other parts are set back and sheltered from sea winds by greenery. The elaborate adventure playground – the largest free play area in the South East with wooden pirate ships, sand pits, zip-lines, and tunnel slides – will occupy younger children. Once they're done, drag them away to a nearby cafe, such as The Lift Cafe, serving thick sourdough toasties made with bread from the local Docker Bakery. Follow the Coastal Path's distinctive Zig Zag Path, which was created in the 1920s from an artifical sandstone mix called Pulhamite. The path wends down to the park from its starting point on the Victorian promenade of The Leas passing planters of Mediterranean vegetation and grottos that appear as if hewn from natural rock. Photogenic Mermaid Beach is nearby, and has a swimming spot that is popular with locals all year long." A firm favourite with visitors and locals alike, the ever popular Lower Leas Coastal Park has magnificent views and plenty of activities to keep the children busy. Split into three areas this coastal park has something for everyone, with its formal gardens, wild area and the largest free play area in the South East. Here is what some recent visitors had to say: "This park is divine! It really is beautiful. Stunning and unusual plants and flowers. A huge credit to those upkeeping the place." "Well worth the walk from the Martello tower to the café on the edge of the cliff and back down the cliffs." The rail is absolutely beautiful and our son had the time of his life on the enormous playground."
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Lower Leas Coastal Park
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Explore Lower Leas Coastal Park  You can easily lose a whole day with children in Folkestone’s Lower Leas Coastal Park, which has a transportive "is-this-really-the-UK?" quality thanks in part to the dramatic botanical architecture of its well-maintained gardens, with many Mediterranean and non-native plants.  Much of the park has sea views, while other parts are set back and sheltered from sea winds by greenery. The elaborate adventure playground – the largest free play area in the South East with wooden pirate ships, sand pits, zip-lines, and tunnel slides – will occupy younger children. Once they're done, drag them away to a nearby cafe, such as The Lift Cafe, serving thick sourdough toasties made with bread from the local Docker Bakery. Follow the Coastal Path's distinctive Zig Zag Path, which was created in the 1920s from an artifical sandstone mix called Pulhamite. The path wends down to the park from its starting point on the Victorian promenade of The Leas passing planters of Mediterranean vegetation and grottos that appear as if hewn from natural rock. Photogenic Mermaid Beach is nearby, and has a swimming spot that is popular with locals all year long." A firm favourite with visitors and locals alike, the ever popular Lower Leas Coastal Park has magnificent views and plenty of activities to keep the children busy. Split into three areas this coastal park has something for everyone, with its formal gardens, wild area and the largest free play area in the South East. Here is what some recent visitors had to say: "This park is divine! It really is beautiful. Stunning and unusual plants and flowers. A huge credit to those upkeeping the place." "Well worth the walk from the Martello tower to the café on the edge of the cliff and back down the cliffs." The rail is absolutely beautiful and our son had the time of his life on the enormous playground."
Have a family day out at Dover Castle   A seasonal program of weekend events, from Easter Egg hunts to a Christmas Adventure Quest, keep families returning to Dover Castle. The sweeping views across the Channel from the battlements never lose their "wow" factor, either.  Arguably as engaging as the castle’s storied medieval history and Great Tower, are its Secret Wartime Tunnels. These chalk passageways give a great insight into how the castle found new life as a base during WWI and WWII, including housing an underground hospital. Beware that the underground paths are narrow, dark, and damp, which may make some visitors uncomfortable."
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Dover Castle
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Have a family day out at Dover Castle   A seasonal program of weekend events, from Easter Egg hunts to a Christmas Adventure Quest, keep families returning to Dover Castle. The sweeping views across the Channel from the battlements never lose their "wow" factor, either.  Arguably as engaging as the castle’s storied medieval history and Great Tower, are its Secret Wartime Tunnels. These chalk passageways give a great insight into how the castle found new life as a base during WWI and WWII, including housing an underground hospital. Beware that the underground paths are narrow, dark, and damp, which may make some visitors uncomfortable."
Splash about at Sunny Sands Beach When it comes to Kent’s sandy beaches, Margate seems to capture many day-trippers’ imaginations, but the smaller Folkestone beach of Sunny Sands, adjacent to the town’s regenerated harbor area, is almost as tempting (and a shorter train journey from London).  This golden stretch hosts paddling toddlers, sunbathers, and casual swimmers in summer, before colder weather gives ways to bundled-up dog-walkers enjoying the still-glittering views across the Channel. Cold water-loving locals take a Boxing Day dip here en masse every December 26. A word of warning, though: The beach disappears entirely at high tide, so check the tide tables before visiting. There are kiosks for ice creams and buckets and spades, and you’re also in walking distance of the smart dining and cocktail bar of Rocksalt, with lovely views across the harbor." This popular beach is located close to the town centre and next to Folkestone Harbour, so you don't need to go for to access any amenities. The beach is one of the closest sandy beaches to London and can get quite busy, dogs are banned on the beach from May to October, so be sure to leave the pooch at home. Here is what the reviewers have to say: "Beautiful beach, lovely day out. fabulous views and scenery. Great for all ages. Lots to see and do. Very clean beach, worth a visit." "A lovely sandy beach away from the shingle which is great for children as it has rock pools and a safe swimming area." "Long sandy beach, lots of space and clean sea. Really nice to relax for the day on. Short walk to get an ice cream. Beautiful place." 5. Eurotunnel Le Shuttle  Eurotunnel (Image: AFP/Getty Images) Have you experienced a trip on the Eurotunnel yet? there are lots of reviews for this one, so if you are undecided maybe check them out and give it a try. Overall rating: 3.5/5 based on 2,430 reviews Here is what people think of their experience: "Passed through Eurotunnel 4 Times this week all four times excellent service on returning to UK the strange way of getting tickets for coaches but still alright" "Used the Euro tunnel in March and the staff were helpful" "We arrived around 4am. Not many lanes open but did not expect there to be around this time. Staff very friendly and polite." 6. Folkestone Creative Quarter  The Creative Quarter in Folkestone (Image: KentLive) The cultural heart of Folkestone and a great place to shop local from a selection of independent traders, artists and creatives. A great place if you love all things vintage, or are looking for a quirky gift, or something a little bit different for yourself. There is a great selection of food and drink options when you need for a refuel, or just want to have a coffee and watch the world go by. If art is your thing then you are certainly in the right area, with a selection of different artists showing their work here. A great place to go for a relaxing browse and a coffee. Overall rating: 4/5 based on 312 reviews. Here is what the visitors have to say: "Sleep Street Coffee Shop is an excellent place for coffee, tea or delicious cake. Surrounded by hundreds of books the ambience is relaxed, service is great and well worth visiting." "It is really nice to see the hard work that has been put into re-developing this area. Hilly small cobbled streets with a variety of shops and cafes." "This is an interesting area of Folkestone, cobbled stone tiny narrow streets, with a lot of different shops, well worth taking a look, at what it has to offer." 7. Zig Zag Path  The zig zag path in Folkestone (Image: Wikicommons) This pathway is placed between the Leas Cliff Hall and the Band Stand and offers a fantastic scenic route with some of the most wonderful coastal views. Leading down to the seafront it consists of different pathways and caves all the way down to Lower Leas Coastal Park. The path has historical value too as it was originally build in the 1800s to ferry bath chairs between the Leas and the beach. Overall rating: 4.5/5 based on 79 reviews. Here is what people have to say about the pathway: "Lovely place to walk, who designed was very creative and is nicely done." "One of our favourite walks where we take the zig zag path to the promenade and then walk to the harbour arm and then through the town and back along the leas." "This a lovely walk especially if part of a circuit of the town. It zig zags all the way to the beach." 8. Leas Cliff Hall  Leas Cliff Hall Folkestone's premier entertainment venue was originally built in 1927, it has been refurbished several times and has a long and colourful history. It has played host to some great music acts such as Ozzy Osbourne, Kings of Leon, McFly and Status Quo, to name but a few. There is a huge calendar of events on the website, so visit there if you want to see which big name will be performing next and be sure to secure your ticket for your favourite performer. Overall rating: 4.5/5 based on 159 reviews Here is what the visitors have to say: "It's great to be back for live performances. Here, with friends, to see a tribute band and a great evening it was." "Lovely theatre, friendly and helpful staff." "This is a first class entertainment venue presenting some very good shows. We are already booking tickets for our next visit." 9 East Cliff and Warren Country Park  East Cliff and Warren country park gives excellent views of the Kent Coast (Image: Google) This is all about the views, as the reviews will tell you. Closest to the town centre there are wide open laws overlooking the cliffs, with a playground, bowls club and Pitch and Putt golf course. Venture further East and you will come across the landscape called The Warren, there are many walks to choose from that lead you along the coast, including the Four Seasons Walk. This could also be a good spot for birdwatching as as around 150 different species of birds can be found in this area. Overall rating: 4.5/5 based on 93 reviews. Here is what reviewers have to say: "Make the short climb up the steps from the Sunny Sands beach to enjoy the amazing views across the whole of Folkestone, but also towards the white cliffs to the east of the town." "Its worth taking five minutes to stand and stare at the views of the cliffs, the water, and on a good day you can see France over the channel." "Big opportunity to fall in love with a view." 10. Quarterhouse  Looking over Tontine Street, where Folkestone Quarterhouse and other Creative Quarter buildings are based (Image: KentLive) A performing arts venue in the heart of Folkestone's creative quarter. They operate a regular programme of theatre, music, film, comedy, and as the website says 'everything in between' A full list of events is available on the website HERE. Overall rating: 4.5/5 based on 75 reviews. This is what visitors to the Quarterhouse have to say: "I loved it here I haven’t been in years but last time I went was to see Ross Montgomery who is an amazing author." "It was amazing Jo Brand at her best, tears of laughter all evening. Such fun." "First time at the Quarterhouse. Great show, very funny, lots of banter with the audience." 11. Elham Valley Line Trust Countryside Centre and Railway Museum  Elham Valley Line Trust Countryside Centre and Railway Museum (Image: Google Maps) Formed in 1984 the Elham Valley Line Trust is dedicated to preserving railway history, countryside crafts and provide educational facilities. The railway museum transports you back to the 1930's where you can operate a replica signal box and even have a train ride. Overall rating: 4.5/5 based on 68 reviews This is what the visitors have to say: "Very pleasant couple of hours with a two year old. Fun little train ride, nice play areas and the café very reasonably priced. Staff really pleasant too. Would definitely recommend as a fun, good value trip out. "An inexpensive attraction, showing how far railways and travel has come since the turn of the 20th century." "The museum is a great review of railways from times gone by. The boys loved the old signal box where you can pull the old signal leavers and move some signals." 12. Kingsnorth Gardens Described as a 'much-loved refuge right in the middle of town' the gardens are a popular choice if you are wanting a tranquil atmosphere. The formal gardens are a mixture of Italianate, Oriental and English styles, all maintained to a very high standard, with an extensive rose garden, pergolas at the Western end and ponds complete with fountains, water lilies and goldfish. Loading Overall rating: 4.5/5 based on 58 reviews. Here are what reviewers of Kingsnorth have to say: "The perfume from the flowers was beautiful. The colours of the tulip and salmon pink acres were a magical. Well done the gardeners and Folkestone council." SIMILAR ARTICLES TO THIS 138329484001 138329484214  Deal is one of the best places to live in Kent but I'm glad it's not number 1 1COMMENTS  Coco Pops vs Tesco, Aldi and Sainsbury’s own brands: We found the best ‘bowl full of fun’ 1COMMENTS  The castle is calling! Hever Castle and Gardens has a host of fun, family activities planned for Easter  Kent's Starbucks coffee shops ranked from best to worst according to TripAdvisor  Why Tonbridge Castle is one of Kent’s must-see attractions  Sevenoaks: The peaceful town named the best place to live in Kent 2COMMENTS  Deal and Sevenoaks listed as two of the best places to live in UK according to The Sunday Times  EastEnders' June Brown's life off camera: Age, net worth and why she'll never leave Folkestone 1COMMENTS  Operation Brock: Diversion route in place on M20 as traffic chaos mounts  Dungeness: The 'best seaside town in Kent' perfect for a spring day out 3COMMENTS  Operation Brock causes M2 delays in Faversham due to checks on lorries bypassing M20  Operation Brock: Live updates as M20 eastbound is shut due to 'severe congestion'  Live M20, Operation Brock A2, A20 traffic updates as chaos continues in Dover and Folkestone  Operation Brock explained: Why it was brought in and why the traffic is so bad 4COMMENTS  Live M20, A2, A20 Operation Brock traffic updates as chaos continues in Dover and Folkestone  Operation Brock: Diversion routes following M20 closure  Deal is one of the best places to live in Kent but I'm glad it's not number 1 1COMMENTS  Coco Pops vs Tesco, Aldi and Sainsbury’s own brands: We found the best ‘bowl full of fun’ 1COMMENTS  The castle is calling! Hever Castle and Gardens has a host of fun, family activities planned for Easter  Kent's Starbucks coffee shops ranked from best to worst according to TripAdvisor  Why Tonbridge Castle is one of Kent’s must-see attractions  Sevenoaks: The peaceful town named the best place to live in Kent 2COMMENTS  Deal and Sevenoaks listed as two of the best places to live in UK according to The Sunday Times  EastEnders' June Brown's life off camera: Age, net worth and why she'll never leave Folkestone 1COMMENTS  Operation Brock: Diversion route in place on M20 as traffic chaos mounts  Dungeness: The 'best seaside town in Kent' perfect for a spring day out 3COMMENTS  Operation Brock causes M2 delays in Faversham due to checks on lorries bypassing M20  Operation Brock: Live updates as M20 eastbound is shut due to 'severe congestion'  Live M20, Operation Brock A2, A20 traffic updates as chaos continues in Dover and Folkestone  Operation Brock explained: Why it was brought in and why the traffic is so bad 4COMMENTS  Live M20, A2, A20 Operation Brock traffic updates as chaos continues in Dover and Folkestone  Operation Brock: Diversion routes following M20 closure  Deal is one of the best places to live in Kent but I'm glad it's not number 1 1COMMENTS  Coco Pops vs Tesco, Aldi and Sainsbury’s own brands: We found the best ‘bowl full of fun’ 1COMMENTS  The castle is calling! Hever Castle and Gardens has a host of fun, family activities planned for Easter  Kent's Starbucks coffee shops ranked from best to worst according to TripAdvisor  Why Tonbridge Castle is one of Kent’s must-see attractions  Sevenoaks: The peaceful town named the best place to live in Kent 2COMMENTS 138266811583  Deal and Sevenoaks listed as two of the best places to live in UK according to The Sunday Times  EastEnders' June Brown's life off camera: Age, net worth and why she'll never leave Folkestone 1COMMENTS 138254603774  Operation Brock: Diversion route in place on M20 as traffic chaos mounts  Dungeness: The 'best seaside town in Kent' perfect for a spring day out 3COMMENTS 138266811598  Operation Brock causes M2 delays in Faversham due to checks on lorries bypassing M20  Operation Brock: Live updates as M20 eastbound is shut due to 'severe congestion'  Live M20, Operation Brock A2, A20 traffic updates as chaos continues in Dover and Folkestone  Operation Brock explained: Why it was brought in and why the traffic is so bad 4COMMENTS 138254547945  Live M20, A2, A20 Operation Brock traffic updates as chaos continues in Dover and Folkestone  Operation Brock: Diversion routes following M20 closure 138254545098  Deal is one of the best places to live in Kent but I'm glad it's not number 1 1COMMENTS  Coco Pops vs Tesco, Aldi and Sainsbury’s own brands: We found the best ‘bowl full of fun’ 1COMMENTS  The castle is calling! Hever Castle and Gardens has a host of fun, family activities planned for Easter  Kent's Starbucks coffee shops ranked from best to worst according to TripAdvisor  Why Tonbridge Castle is one of Kent’s must-see attractions  Sevenoaks: The peaceful town named the best place to live in Kent 2COMMENTS  Deal and Sevenoaks listed as two of the best places to live in UK according to The Sunday Times  EastEnders' June Brown's life off camera: Age, net worth and why she'll never leave Folkestone 1COMMENTS  Operation Brock: Diversion route in place on M20 as traffic chaos mounts  Dungeness: The 'best seaside town in Kent' perfect for a spring day out 3COMMENTS  Operation Brock causes M2 delays in Faversham due to checks on lorries bypassing M20  Operation Brock: Live updates as M20 eastbound is shut due to 'severe congestion'  Live M20, Operation Brock A2, A20 traffic updates as chaos continues in Dover and Folkestone  Operation Brock explained: Why it was brought in and why the traffic is so bad 4COMMENTS  Live M20, A2, A20 Operation Brock traffic updates as chaos continues in Dover and Folkestone  Operation Brock: Diversion routes following M20 closure  Deal is one of the best places to live in Kent but I'm glad it's not number 1 1COMMENTS  Coco Pops vs Tesco, Aldi and Sainsbury’s own brands: We found the best ‘bowl full of fun’ 1COMMENTS  The castle is calling! Hever Castle and Gardens has a host of fun, family activities planned for Easter  Kent's Starbucks coffee shops ranked from best to worst according to TripAdvisor  Why Tonbridge Castle is one of Kent’s must-see attractions  Sevenoaks: The peaceful town named the best place to live in Kent 2COMMENTS  Deal and Sevenoaks listed as two of the best places to live in UK according to The Sunday Times  EastEnders' June Brown's life off camera: Age, net worth and why she'll never leave Folkestone 1COMMENTS  Operation Brock: Diversion route in place on M20 as traffic chaos mounts  Dungeness: The 'best seaside town in Kent' perfect for a spring day out 3COMMENTS  Operation Brock causes M2 delays in Faversham due to checks on lorries bypassing M20  Operation Brock: Live updates as M20 eastbound is shut due to 'severe congestion'  Live M20, Operation Brock A2, A20 traffic updates as chaos continues in Dover and Folkestone  Operation Brock explained: Why it was brought in and why the traffic is so bad 4COMMENTS  Live M20, A2, A20 Operation Brock traffic updates as chaos continues in Dover and Folkestone  Operation Brock: Diversion routes following M20 closure Powered by  "A lovely place to visit when you need a little down time, calm areas to read a book, smell lovely flowers in the summer, walk the children, explain about gardens. A tranquil place." "Lovely surroundings to soak up the sun or stretch your legs. I particularly enjoy the ponds often see dragonflies".
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Sunny Sands
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Splash about at Sunny Sands Beach When it comes to Kent’s sandy beaches, Margate seems to capture many day-trippers’ imaginations, but the smaller Folkestone beach of Sunny Sands, adjacent to the town’s regenerated harbor area, is almost as tempting (and a shorter train journey from London).  This golden stretch hosts paddling toddlers, sunbathers, and casual swimmers in summer, before colder weather gives ways to bundled-up dog-walkers enjoying the still-glittering views across the Channel. Cold water-loving locals take a Boxing Day dip here en masse every December 26. A word of warning, though: The beach disappears entirely at high tide, so check the tide tables before visiting. There are kiosks for ice creams and buckets and spades, and you’re also in walking distance of the smart dining and cocktail bar of Rocksalt, with lovely views across the harbor." This popular beach is located close to the town centre and next to Folkestone Harbour, so you don't need to go for to access any amenities. The beach is one of the closest sandy beaches to London and can get quite busy, dogs are banned on the beach from May to October, so be sure to leave the pooch at home. Here is what the reviewers have to say: "Beautiful beach, lovely day out. fabulous views and scenery. Great for all ages. Lots to see and do. Very clean beach, worth a visit." "A lovely sandy beach away from the shingle which is great for children as it has rock pools and a safe swimming area." "Long sandy beach, lots of space and clean sea. Really nice to relax for the day on. Short walk to get an ice cream. Beautiful place." 5. Eurotunnel Le Shuttle  Eurotunnel (Image: AFP/Getty Images) Have you experienced a trip on the Eurotunnel yet? there are lots of reviews for this one, so if you are undecided maybe check them out and give it a try. Overall rating: 3.5/5 based on 2,430 reviews Here is what people think of their experience: "Passed through Eurotunnel 4 Times this week all four times excellent service on returning to UK the strange way of getting tickets for coaches but still alright" "Used the Euro tunnel in March and the staff were helpful" "We arrived around 4am. Not many lanes open but did not expect there to be around this time. Staff very friendly and polite." 6. Folkestone Creative Quarter  The Creative Quarter in Folkestone (Image: KentLive) The cultural heart of Folkestone and a great place to shop local from a selection of independent traders, artists and creatives. A great place if you love all things vintage, or are looking for a quirky gift, or something a little bit different for yourself. There is a great selection of food and drink options when you need for a refuel, or just want to have a coffee and watch the world go by. If art is your thing then you are certainly in the right area, with a selection of different artists showing their work here. A great place to go for a relaxing browse and a coffee. Overall rating: 4/5 based on 312 reviews. Here is what the visitors have to say: "Sleep Street Coffee Shop is an excellent place for coffee, tea or delicious cake. Surrounded by hundreds of books the ambience is relaxed, service is great and well worth visiting." "It is really nice to see the hard work that has been put into re-developing this area. Hilly small cobbled streets with a variety of shops and cafes." "This is an interesting area of Folkestone, cobbled stone tiny narrow streets, with a lot of different shops, well worth taking a look, at what it has to offer." 7. Zig Zag Path  The zig zag path in Folkestone (Image: Wikicommons) This pathway is placed between the Leas Cliff Hall and the Band Stand and offers a fantastic scenic route with some of the most wonderful coastal views. Leading down to the seafront it consists of different pathways and caves all the way down to Lower Leas Coastal Park. The path has historical value too as it was originally build in the 1800s to ferry bath chairs between the Leas and the beach. Overall rating: 4.5/5 based on 79 reviews. Here is what people have to say about the pathway: "Lovely place to walk, who designed was very creative and is nicely done." "One of our favourite walks where we take the zig zag path to the promenade and then walk to the harbour arm and then through the town and back along the leas." "This a lovely walk especially if part of a circuit of the town. It zig zags all the way to the beach." 8. Leas Cliff Hall  Leas Cliff Hall Folkestone's premier entertainment venue was originally built in 1927, it has been refurbished several times and has a long and colourful history. It has played host to some great music acts such as Ozzy Osbourne, Kings of Leon, McFly and Status Quo, to name but a few. There is a huge calendar of events on the website, so visit there if you want to see which big name will be performing next and be sure to secure your ticket for your favourite performer. Overall rating: 4.5/5 based on 159 reviews Here is what the visitors have to say: "It's great to be back for live performances. Here, with friends, to see a tribute band and a great evening it was." "Lovely theatre, friendly and helpful staff." "This is a first class entertainment venue presenting some very good shows. We are already booking tickets for our next visit." 9 East Cliff and Warren Country Park  East Cliff and Warren country park gives excellent views of the Kent Coast (Image: Google) This is all about the views, as the reviews will tell you. Closest to the town centre there are wide open laws overlooking the cliffs, with a playground, bowls club and Pitch and Putt golf course. Venture further East and you will come across the landscape called The Warren, there are many walks to choose from that lead you along the coast, including the Four Seasons Walk. This could also be a good spot for birdwatching as as around 150 different species of birds can be found in this area. Overall rating: 4.5/5 based on 93 reviews. Here is what reviewers have to say: "Make the short climb up the steps from the Sunny Sands beach to enjoy the amazing views across the whole of Folkestone, but also towards the white cliffs to the east of the town." "Its worth taking five minutes to stand and stare at the views of the cliffs, the water, and on a good day you can see France over the channel." "Big opportunity to fall in love with a view." 10. Quarterhouse  Looking over Tontine Street, where Folkestone Quarterhouse and other Creative Quarter buildings are based (Image: KentLive) A performing arts venue in the heart of Folkestone's creative quarter. They operate a regular programme of theatre, music, film, comedy, and as the website says 'everything in between' A full list of events is available on the website HERE. Overall rating: 4.5/5 based on 75 reviews. This is what visitors to the Quarterhouse have to say: "I loved it here I haven’t been in years but last time I went was to see Ross Montgomery who is an amazing author." "It was amazing Jo Brand at her best, tears of laughter all evening. Such fun." "First time at the Quarterhouse. Great show, very funny, lots of banter with the audience." 11. Elham Valley Line Trust Countryside Centre and Railway Museum  Elham Valley Line Trust Countryside Centre and Railway Museum (Image: Google Maps) Formed in 1984 the Elham Valley Line Trust is dedicated to preserving railway history, countryside crafts and provide educational facilities. The railway museum transports you back to the 1930's where you can operate a replica signal box and even have a train ride. Overall rating: 4.5/5 based on 68 reviews This is what the visitors have to say: "Very pleasant couple of hours with a two year old. Fun little train ride, nice play areas and the café very reasonably priced. Staff really pleasant too. Would definitely recommend as a fun, good value trip out. "An inexpensive attraction, showing how far railways and travel has come since the turn of the 20th century." "The museum is a great review of railways from times gone by. The boys loved the old signal box where you can pull the old signal leavers and move some signals." 12. Kingsnorth Gardens Described as a 'much-loved refuge right in the middle of town' the gardens are a popular choice if you are wanting a tranquil atmosphere. The formal gardens are a mixture of Italianate, Oriental and English styles, all maintained to a very high standard, with an extensive rose garden, pergolas at the Western end and ponds complete with fountains, water lilies and goldfish. Loading Overall rating: 4.5/5 based on 58 reviews. Here are what reviewers of Kingsnorth have to say: "The perfume from the flowers was beautiful. The colours of the tulip and salmon pink acres were a magical. Well done the gardeners and Folkestone council." SIMILAR ARTICLES TO THIS 138329484001 138329484214  Deal is one of the best places to live in Kent but I'm glad it's not number 1 1COMMENTS  Coco Pops vs Tesco, Aldi and Sainsbury’s own brands: We found the best ‘bowl full of fun’ 1COMMENTS  The castle is calling! Hever Castle and Gardens has a host of fun, family activities planned for Easter  Kent's Starbucks coffee shops ranked from best to worst according to TripAdvisor  Why Tonbridge Castle is one of Kent’s must-see attractions  Sevenoaks: The peaceful town named the best place to live in Kent 2COMMENTS  Deal and Sevenoaks listed as two of the best places to live in UK according to The Sunday Times  EastEnders' June Brown's life off camera: Age, net worth and why she'll never leave Folkestone 1COMMENTS  Operation Brock: Diversion route in place on M20 as traffic chaos mounts  Dungeness: The 'best seaside town in Kent' perfect for a spring day out 3COMMENTS  Operation Brock causes M2 delays in Faversham due to checks on lorries bypassing M20  Operation Brock: Live updates as M20 eastbound is shut due to 'severe congestion'  Live M20, Operation Brock A2, A20 traffic updates as chaos continues in Dover and Folkestone  Operation Brock explained: Why it was brought in and why the traffic is so bad 4COMMENTS  Live M20, A2, A20 Operation Brock traffic updates as chaos continues in Dover and Folkestone  Operation Brock: Diversion routes following M20 closure  Deal is one of the best places to live in Kent but I'm glad it's not number 1 1COMMENTS  Coco Pops vs Tesco, Aldi and Sainsbury’s own brands: We found the best ‘bowl full of fun’ 1COMMENTS  The castle is calling! Hever Castle and Gardens has a host of fun, family activities planned for Easter  Kent's Starbucks coffee shops ranked from best to worst according to TripAdvisor  Why Tonbridge Castle is one of Kent’s must-see attractions  Sevenoaks: The peaceful town named the best place to live in Kent 2COMMENTS  Deal and Sevenoaks listed as two of the best places to live in UK according to The Sunday Times  EastEnders' June Brown's life off camera: Age, net worth and why she'll never leave Folkestone 1COMMENTS  Operation Brock: Diversion route in place on M20 as traffic chaos mounts  Dungeness: The 'best seaside town in Kent' perfect for a spring day out 3COMMENTS  Operation Brock causes M2 delays in Faversham due to checks on lorries bypassing M20  Operation Brock: Live updates as M20 eastbound is shut due to 'severe congestion'  Live M20, Operation Brock A2, A20 traffic updates as chaos continues in Dover and Folkestone  Operation Brock explained: Why it was brought in and why the traffic is so bad 4COMMENTS  Live M20, A2, A20 Operation Brock traffic updates as chaos continues in Dover and Folkestone  Operation Brock: Diversion routes following M20 closure  Deal is one of the best places to live in Kent but I'm glad it's not number 1 1COMMENTS  Coco Pops vs Tesco, Aldi and Sainsbury’s own brands: We found the best ‘bowl full of fun’ 1COMMENTS  The castle is calling! Hever Castle and Gardens has a host of fun, family activities planned for Easter  Kent's Starbucks coffee shops ranked from best to worst according to TripAdvisor  Why Tonbridge Castle is one of Kent’s must-see attractions  Sevenoaks: The peaceful town named the best place to live in Kent 2COMMENTS 138266811583  Deal and Sevenoaks listed as two of the best places to live in UK according to The Sunday Times  EastEnders' June Brown's life off camera: Age, net worth and why she'll never leave Folkestone 1COMMENTS 138254603774  Operation Brock: Diversion route in place on M20 as traffic chaos mounts  Dungeness: The 'best seaside town in Kent' perfect for a spring day out 3COMMENTS 138266811598  Operation Brock causes M2 delays in Faversham due to checks on lorries bypassing M20  Operation Brock: Live updates as M20 eastbound is shut due to 'severe congestion'  Live M20, Operation Brock A2, A20 traffic updates as chaos continues in Dover and Folkestone  Operation Brock explained: Why it was brought in and why the traffic is so bad 4COMMENTS 138254547945  Live M20, A2, A20 Operation Brock traffic updates as chaos continues in Dover and Folkestone  Operation Brock: Diversion routes following M20 closure 138254545098  Deal is one of the best places to live in Kent but I'm glad it's not number 1 1COMMENTS  Coco Pops vs Tesco, Aldi and Sainsbury’s own brands: We found the best ‘bowl full of fun’ 1COMMENTS  The castle is calling! Hever Castle and Gardens has a host of fun, family activities planned for Easter  Kent's Starbucks coffee shops ranked from best to worst according to TripAdvisor  Why Tonbridge Castle is one of Kent’s must-see attractions  Sevenoaks: The peaceful town named the best place to live in Kent 2COMMENTS  Deal and Sevenoaks listed as two of the best places to live in UK according to The Sunday Times  EastEnders' June Brown's life off camera: Age, net worth and why she'll never leave Folkestone 1COMMENTS  Operation Brock: Diversion route in place on M20 as traffic chaos mounts  Dungeness: The 'best seaside town in Kent' perfect for a spring day out 3COMMENTS  Operation Brock causes M2 delays in Faversham due to checks on lorries bypassing M20  Operation Brock: Live updates as M20 eastbound is shut due to 'severe congestion'  Live M20, Operation Brock A2, A20 traffic updates as chaos continues in Dover and Folkestone  Operation Brock explained: Why it was brought in and why the traffic is so bad 4COMMENTS  Live M20, A2, A20 Operation Brock traffic updates as chaos continues in Dover and Folkestone  Operation Brock: Diversion routes following M20 closure  Deal is one of the best places to live in Kent but I'm glad it's not number 1 1COMMENTS  Coco Pops vs Tesco, Aldi and Sainsbury’s own brands: We found the best ‘bowl full of fun’ 1COMMENTS  The castle is calling! Hever Castle and Gardens has a host of fun, family activities planned for Easter  Kent's Starbucks coffee shops ranked from best to worst according to TripAdvisor  Why Tonbridge Castle is one of Kent’s must-see attractions  Sevenoaks: The peaceful town named the best place to live in Kent 2COMMENTS  Deal and Sevenoaks listed as two of the best places to live in UK according to The Sunday Times  EastEnders' June Brown's life off camera: Age, net worth and why she'll never leave Folkestone 1COMMENTS  Operation Brock: Diversion route in place on M20 as traffic chaos mounts  Dungeness: The 'best seaside town in Kent' perfect for a spring day out 3COMMENTS  Operation Brock causes M2 delays in Faversham due to checks on lorries bypassing M20  Operation Brock: Live updates as M20 eastbound is shut due to 'severe congestion'  Live M20, Operation Brock A2, A20 traffic updates as chaos continues in Dover and Folkestone  Operation Brock explained: Why it was brought in and why the traffic is so bad 4COMMENTS  Live M20, A2, A20 Operation Brock traffic updates as chaos continues in Dover and Folkestone  Operation Brock: Diversion routes following M20 closure Powered by  "A lovely place to visit when you need a little down time, calm areas to read a book, smell lovely flowers in the summer, walk the children, explain about gardens. A tranquil place." "Lovely surroundings to soak up the sun or stretch your legs. I particularly enjoy the ponds often see dragonflies".
Go shopping at Deal's Saturday market  Making plans to browse the long-established Saturday market in Deal will give some direction to a weekend day trip to this coastal hot spot, where the thoughtful refurbishment of local establishments like the Rose Hotel has piqued the interest of glossy magazine editors and London professionals trying to buy a house. Less than a 10 minute walk from the train station, the morning market (open from 8am or 9am depending on the time of year) is also just a couple of streets back from Deal’s refreshingly long stretch of shingle beach.  The market has existed here in various forms since the late 1600s. Today’s stallholders sell everything from handmade soaps to vintage toys, and quality food from Kent's farmers and makers. Pick up what you need – and a few things you don’t – before grabbing some lunch and making the most of the sea air."
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Deal
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Go shopping at Deal's Saturday market  Making plans to browse the long-established Saturday market in Deal will give some direction to a weekend day trip to this coastal hot spot, where the thoughtful refurbishment of local establishments like the Rose Hotel has piqued the interest of glossy magazine editors and London professionals trying to buy a house. Less than a 10 minute walk from the train station, the morning market (open from 8am or 9am depending on the time of year) is also just a couple of streets back from Deal’s refreshingly long stretch of shingle beach.  The market has existed here in various forms since the late 1600s. Today’s stallholders sell everything from handmade soaps to vintage toys, and quality food from Kent's farmers and makers. Pick up what you need – and a few things you don’t – before grabbing some lunch and making the most of the sea air."
Get close to France at the beautiful St Margaret's Bay  An aesthetically pleasing curve of shingle beach and green sea, St Margaret's Bay appears on several popular walking routes in this part of White Cliffs country.   Its resident boozer, The Coastguard, bills itself as Britain’s nearest pub to France (on this part of the coast, you might even receive a "Welcome to France" message from your phone provider, or French radio stations on your car stereo). The 300-year-old establishment’s best selling point is its sea-view terrace where visitors take in the view of the bay over a cold pint or a warming nip of whiskey. There is sometimes an informal beach school meet-up for outdoorsy under-5s and their parents here, too. But in general you have a fair chance of having the bay almost to yourself."
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Saint Margarets Bay
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Get close to France at the beautiful St Margaret's Bay  An aesthetically pleasing curve of shingle beach and green sea, St Margaret's Bay appears on several popular walking routes in this part of White Cliffs country.   Its resident boozer, The Coastguard, bills itself as Britain’s nearest pub to France (on this part of the coast, you might even receive a "Welcome to France" message from your phone provider, or French radio stations on your car stereo). The 300-year-old establishment’s best selling point is its sea-view terrace where visitors take in the view of the bay over a cold pint or a warming nip of whiskey. There is sometimes an informal beach school meet-up for outdoorsy under-5s and their parents here, too. But in general you have a fair chance of having the bay almost to yourself."
See biodiversity on reclaimed land at Samphire Hoe Samphire Hoe is a unique nature reserve that was created during the building of the Channel Tunnel, when almost 5 million cubic meters of spoil were deposited at the base of Shakespeare Cliff, near Dover, to reclaim land from the English Channel.  This area was seeded with wildflowers and opened to the public in 1997. It has since acquired stellar biodiversity credentials, as the 30-ha (74-acre) area is home to more than 200 plant species and even more species of birds. Despite the site’s youth, what you are struck by as a visitor here is a sense of timelessness, thanks to its meditative views of expansive sea and dramatic vistas of the rugged White Cliffs of Dover."
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Samphire Hoe
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See biodiversity on reclaimed land at Samphire Hoe Samphire Hoe is a unique nature reserve that was created during the building of the Channel Tunnel, when almost 5 million cubic meters of spoil were deposited at the base of Shakespeare Cliff, near Dover, to reclaim land from the English Channel.  This area was seeded with wildflowers and opened to the public in 1997. It has since acquired stellar biodiversity credentials, as the 30-ha (74-acre) area is home to more than 200 plant species and even more species of birds. Despite the site’s youth, what you are struck by as a visitor here is a sense of timelessness, thanks to its meditative views of expansive sea and dramatic vistas of the rugged White Cliffs of Dover."
Ride the miniature railway from Hythe  Hythe has much to recommend it, including some choice secondhand shops worth a rummage and a walkable stretch of Royal Military Canal. But one of the best things to do here is to leave aboard the Romney, Hythe and Dymchurch Railway. The railway’s one-third-size locomotives take passengers as far as the eerily beautiful nature reserve of Dungeness (just over an hour, each way).  Once there, enjoy the shingle beach and visit the late filmmaker Derek Jarman’s garden, before taking the tiny train back to Hythe and choosing between its gastropubs pubs for an evening meal."
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Romney Hythe & Dymchurch Railway
2 Littlestone Road
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Ride the miniature railway from Hythe  Hythe has much to recommend it, including some choice secondhand shops worth a rummage and a walkable stretch of Royal Military Canal. But one of the best things to do here is to leave aboard the Romney, Hythe and Dymchurch Railway. The railway’s one-third-size locomotives take passengers as far as the eerily beautiful nature reserve of Dungeness (just over an hour, each way).  Once there, enjoy the shingle beach and visit the late filmmaker Derek Jarman’s garden, before taking the tiny train back to Hythe and choosing between its gastropubs pubs for an evening meal."
Wildlife watch at Sandwich and Pegwell Bay National Nature Reserve  The largest of Kent Wildlife Trust’s reserves is Sandwich and Pegwell Bay National Nature Reserve, where you can spend time fully immersed in nature. Its rich in biodiversity with varied habitats, including beach and salt marshes, as well as a more orderly and easy to navigate Country Park.  It’s not unusual to spot seals from here, especially in winter, and in spring, look out for rare green hairstreak butterflies. But this reserve is primarily bird-watchers’ domain, where you might hear nightingales, or spot a short-eared owl, snipe, kestrel, or tern."
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Sandwich
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Wildlife watch at Sandwich and Pegwell Bay National Nature Reserve  The largest of Kent Wildlife Trust’s reserves is Sandwich and Pegwell Bay National Nature Reserve, where you can spend time fully immersed in nature. Its rich in biodiversity with varied habitats, including beach and salt marshes, as well as a more orderly and easy to navigate Country Park.  It’s not unusual to spot seals from here, especially in winter, and in spring, look out for rare green hairstreak butterflies. But this reserve is primarily bird-watchers’ domain, where you might hear nightingales, or spot a short-eared owl, snipe, kestrel, or tern."
Cliffs to South Foreland Lighthouse The Victorian South Foreland Lighthouse  – the first in the world to use electric light and the site of various pioneering experiments in international radio – and its wonderfully retro tearoom are your reward at the end of a bracing walk along the White Cliffs of Dover. Mrs Knotts tearoom ticks the authenticity boxes that English tearooms should: chintzy bone china, pots of loose leaf tea, and generous slabs of cake.  Getting here is part of the pleasure, via either a 2-mile (3.2km) clifftop trail from Dover to really earn that cup of tea, or a shorter walk from St Margaret’s Bay. Choose a still day so you can can contemplate the lighthouse at your leisure; when it’s windier, the lawns here are a popular kite-flying spot. Note that there’s nowhere to park at the lighthouse itself."
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South Foreland Lighthouse
21 preporuka/e lokalaca
Cliffs to South Foreland Lighthouse The Victorian South Foreland Lighthouse  – the first in the world to use electric light and the site of various pioneering experiments in international radio – and its wonderfully retro tearoom are your reward at the end of a bracing walk along the White Cliffs of Dover. Mrs Knotts tearoom ticks the authenticity boxes that English tearooms should: chintzy bone china, pots of loose leaf tea, and generous slabs of cake.  Getting here is part of the pleasure, via either a 2-mile (3.2km) clifftop trail from Dover to really earn that cup of tea, or a shorter walk from St Margaret’s Bay. Choose a still day so you can can contemplate the lighthouse at your leisure; when it’s windier, the lawns here are a popular kite-flying spot. Note that there’s nowhere to park at the lighthouse itself."
From Harpers Bazaar It’s not breaking news that Kentish seaside towns are back in fashion. There’s Whitstable with its candy coloured beach huts and genteel clientele; Broadstairs and its sweeping sandy beaches seemingly borrowed from across the channel; Margate, now an embarrassingly gentrified hipster parody; and Dungeness, its barren seascapes popular with artists and students back from university. Then you have Folkestone, the scrappy underdog with its growing art scene and seafront pubs where locals stare with fleeting suspicion as you walk inside. It’s not a particularly photogenic place upon first sight. Anyone who arrives at Folkestone Central expecting sandy beaches and colourful architecture will be disappointed; the two most prominent buildings that greet visitors are the Saga HQ building and a supersized Asda. This isn’t a town overburdened with visual charm. Folkestone is no Brighton, Whitby or Falmouth - and that’s no bad thing. It was the Channel Tunnel that finally spelt the end of days for Folkestone. At the start of the 20th century, the town was a thriving port and a popular holiday destination among royalty and the British elite. Agatha Christie wrote Murder on the Orient Express from the town’s Grand Hotel, and King Edward VII apparently spent so much time there that locals would peer into his hotel to spy on him and his mistress, Alice Keppel. The first and second world wars weren’t great for business and, if ever there was a fact to illustrate how unlucky Folkestone has been over the years, it’s that the Germans used to drop their leftover bombs on the town before they headed home. The 60s and 70s welcomed overseas travel for the masses and Folkestone slipped into decline. The opening of the Channel Tunnel in 1994 meant that its port was more redundant than ever before. I have always loved Folkestone. I like the regeneration of it, but only because it seems to be an example of one of the few seaside gentrifications that has managed to do so in a respectful way. The locals are still included and it hasn’t tried to arrogantly recreate Peckham by sea, then blithely, righteously quip that it’s boosting the local economy through seasonal employment or by erecting craft breweries that the locals can’t afford to drink in. Unlike some of Kent’s most aesthetically gifted seaside towns such as Whitstable and Broadstairs, Folkestone radiates a stoic, dour quality that is so singular to coastal towns that were once popular; if you’d spent centuries being battered by storms and icy, salty water, being picked up and dropped by DFLs (Down from Londons), you’d be pretty grumpy too. Its high street – not the cobbled stone-covered ‘creative quarter’ – isn’t much to look at, although I challenge you not to enjoy the Italian ice cream at La Casa Del Bello Gelato. It remains steadfastly and resolutely plain in comparison to its quaint postcard-perfect siblings further along the coast. This is a place where Banksy created a mural and a resident spray-painted a penis over the top of it. And yet, despite itself, Folkestone has always possessed certain charms – such as the majestic Leas, a picturesque clifftop promenade overlooking the sea. It was designed in the mid 1800s by Decimus Burton, who also worked on buildings and gardens at London Zoo and Kew Gardens, which gives you an indication of its visual prowess. In the middle stands a Victorian bandstand, surrounded by deckchairs in the summer. Folkestone has a lot of crummy hotels (read the TripAdvisor reviews of the Grand Burstin Hotel if ever you want a good giggle), but The Grand on the Leas is unarguably beautiful – a century-old building designed to be town’s sunniest spot with towering windows and views looking across the ocean to France. I have fond memories of being treated to a ride in the Grade II-listed Leas Lift, which during the '40s and '50s carried thousands of tourists every day to and from the promenade to the seafront. It was closed in 2016 for health and safety reasons, but there are plans to restore it back to its former glory. If you carry on walking along the seafront you’ll reach the Lower Leas Coastal Park, which boasts the largest free adventure play area in the South East. There’s an amphitheatre that hosts children’s workshops, live music, opera and theatre, some of which are free – Shakespeare’s Winter’s Tale is on the agenda for this summer. The award-winning space offers plenty of picnic tables and picturesque spots to sit with a drink, or there’s the Mermaid Café which sits high above the beach below and has long been reenergising walkers and tired families with paninis, jacket potatoes and big cups of tea. On the other side of town, you’ll find Sunny Sands – a small, but perfectly formed sandy beach overlooked by grassy hills decorated with wild thyme and flowers. Charles Dickens came here to write the first chapters of Little Dorrit and described the view from his window: “The cliff overhanging the sea beach and have the sky and the ocean, as it were, framed before you like a beautiful picture." In fact, he continued, his vista was so pretty that he found himself distracted constantly and barely wrote anything. If you keep walking above the hills, you’ll come to The Warren and the East Cliffs, in which overgrown grassy meadows descend to a usually empty pebbly and sandy beach below. It’s overgrown now, but I like that about it – there’s nothing manicured or polished about this side of town. Steep grassy corridors of foliage and rock sea lavender lead down to the sea and the tiny bays themselves look out across to the White Cliffs of Dover. A rare colony of Grayling butterflies has made the Warren its home. You can swim here, but the water will be freezing so approach with caution. A lot has been said about Folkestone’s rising arts scene. This small coastal town has the largest urban outdoor collection of contemporary art in the UK. The changing exhibition currently consists of 74 artworks by 46 artists, most of which have designed their respective piece with the exact site in mind. Think a treasure hunt of outdoor art and you won’t be far off. There’s Cornelia Parker’s mermaid sculpture, which sits high on the rock above Sunny Sands; under the Harbour Arm’s arches stands Anthony Gormley’s cast-iron human statue, which resolutely stares out to the sea; Lubaina Himid – the first Black woman to ever receive the Turner Prize – created a giant ceramic jelly mould where Folkestone’s former fairground, The Rotunda, used to be; and then there’s my favourite, Richard Woods’ Holiday Home, six colourful, cartoon-like bungalows that are dotted in unusual or unlikely spots around the town – in the middle of the shingle beach, floating in the sea or perched on top of rocks in a carpark – to open a discussion about second homes. The idea is that no site is too small, too unlikely, or too inconvenient for its neighbours, for a holiday home. The fifth Folkestone Triennial, The Plot, arrives from Thursday 22 July – Tuesday 2 November 2021, bringing together over 20 new outdoor artworks. There is an argument that the long-standing locals couldn’t care less about public art, but there is a singular quality about these installations that eludes an art gallery which people often feel intimidated by. Public art is inclusive – whether you decide to engage with it or not is entirely up to the viewer. My favourite way to do Folkestone is to start at the harbour. You could eat at Rocksalt, the town’s Michelin-starred restaurant, but you’d be daft to miss the fresh prawns and crab sticks at seafood stall Chummys. If the weather’s bad, head along the cobbled road and under the railway arch to The Ship Inn for hearty pub food in a warming, cosy setting. The fish and chips are particularly good. Afterwards, walk across the new landscaped walkway to the Harbour Arm – one of Folkestone’s biggest recent success stories and an example of gentrification done respectfully. The Harbour Arm was originally a railway terminal (and also a departure point for soldiers on their way to the Western Front), but remained desolate and unused until five years ago, when it was regenerated. Now, it’s peppered with independent food and drink trucks and stands that span Greek food to excellent flat bread pizzas. Live music is a big part of the activity down on the arm, as the locals call it, and there’s no fee to watch any of it. In the summer, there’s a regular vintage market, where prices feel genuinely affordable, as well as film screenings where two tickets cost only £10. Picnic benches and tables and deckchairs look out across the sea to the majestic White Cliffs of Dover. Yes, there’s the family-run champagne lighthouse at the end of the arm, which plays a mix of reggae, blues and funk vinyl, but the best thing about the Harbour Arm is that people from Folkestone actually use it. There are as many people drinking canned beer and sandwiches bought from Asda in the town centre, as there are DFLs. Everyone is invited to watch the live music, soak up the atmosphere and look out to sea. Once you’ve walked up and down the arm, explore the Old High Street or the ‘Creative Quarter’ as it’s now called, which offers a mix of colourful independent shops, cafes and bars, from record and vintage shops to galleries selling unusual neon artworks. My favourite is Rennies Seaside Modern, a beautifully-curated store which sells furniture, vintage seaside posters, ceramics and textiles by 20th Century British artists. Its owners, Paul and Karen Rennie, have such in-depth knowledge and a contagious enthusiasm for every single item in their shop. You won’t want to leave this tiny cabin of unique curiosities. It’s a steep hill up the Old High Street, but a pretty one – each of the buildings are painted different colours – and a lot of the cafes and bars double up as performance spaces that host talks, workshops and gigs. Keep on walking until you come to Church St. Relative culinary newcomer Folkestone Wine Company has received positive reviews from the critics (and also from my grandad, who loved the food, even if he didn’t understand why the plates were mismatched), and The Pullman next door offers that rare thing of being a pub that works just as well in the summer as the winter – its garden and the terrace is pleasant during the warmer months and a seat by the open fire is warming beyond autumn. As nice as the Pullman is, I still prefer the British Lion which is about two minutes’ walk away in a picturesque, secluded spot called The Bayle. The British Lion is thought to be the oldest pub in Folkestone with parts going back to the 1500s and was a favourite of Dickens' when he visited. It’s a snug, welcoming place that locals love and is decorated with dried hops that hang from the beams. End your day here with a pint at the bar or hunker down in one of the booths. Perhaps part of the reason I love Folkestone so much is that it’s where I first fell in love as young teenager. It makes me happy because it reminds me of a time when I was madly happy – that unique form of mad happy that only happens with intense, first love. I remember my first kiss in the then-dilapidated Silver Screen Cinema and long days spent at the Warren or Sunny Sands usually slightly cold and damp but never minding much. I remember listening to garage compilations in his room recorded off the radio and running through town singing them. I remember proms in run-down venues wearing dresses bought on sale at TK Maxx. Maybe I’ve looked at this grumpy little town with rose-tinted glasses ever since. It’s not as uninviting as it used to be, but it’s as genuine and hardy as ever. Folkestone, you’re all that and a bag of very nice chips.
41 preporuka/e lokalaca
Folkestone
41 preporuka/e lokalaca
From Harpers Bazaar It’s not breaking news that Kentish seaside towns are back in fashion. There’s Whitstable with its candy coloured beach huts and genteel clientele; Broadstairs and its sweeping sandy beaches seemingly borrowed from across the channel; Margate, now an embarrassingly gentrified hipster parody; and Dungeness, its barren seascapes popular with artists and students back from university. Then you have Folkestone, the scrappy underdog with its growing art scene and seafront pubs where locals stare with fleeting suspicion as you walk inside. It’s not a particularly photogenic place upon first sight. Anyone who arrives at Folkestone Central expecting sandy beaches and colourful architecture will be disappointed; the two most prominent buildings that greet visitors are the Saga HQ building and a supersized Asda. This isn’t a town overburdened with visual charm. Folkestone is no Brighton, Whitby or Falmouth - and that’s no bad thing. It was the Channel Tunnel that finally spelt the end of days for Folkestone. At the start of the 20th century, the town was a thriving port and a popular holiday destination among royalty and the British elite. Agatha Christie wrote Murder on the Orient Express from the town’s Grand Hotel, and King Edward VII apparently spent so much time there that locals would peer into his hotel to spy on him and his mistress, Alice Keppel. The first and second world wars weren’t great for business and, if ever there was a fact to illustrate how unlucky Folkestone has been over the years, it’s that the Germans used to drop their leftover bombs on the town before they headed home. The 60s and 70s welcomed overseas travel for the masses and Folkestone slipped into decline. The opening of the Channel Tunnel in 1994 meant that its port was more redundant than ever before. I have always loved Folkestone. I like the regeneration of it, but only because it seems to be an example of one of the few seaside gentrifications that has managed to do so in a respectful way. The locals are still included and it hasn’t tried to arrogantly recreate Peckham by sea, then blithely, righteously quip that it’s boosting the local economy through seasonal employment or by erecting craft breweries that the locals can’t afford to drink in. Unlike some of Kent’s most aesthetically gifted seaside towns such as Whitstable and Broadstairs, Folkestone radiates a stoic, dour quality that is so singular to coastal towns that were once popular; if you’d spent centuries being battered by storms and icy, salty water, being picked up and dropped by DFLs (Down from Londons), you’d be pretty grumpy too. Its high street – not the cobbled stone-covered ‘creative quarter’ – isn’t much to look at, although I challenge you not to enjoy the Italian ice cream at La Casa Del Bello Gelato. It remains steadfastly and resolutely plain in comparison to its quaint postcard-perfect siblings further along the coast. This is a place where Banksy created a mural and a resident spray-painted a penis over the top of it. And yet, despite itself, Folkestone has always possessed certain charms – such as the majestic Leas, a picturesque clifftop promenade overlooking the sea. It was designed in the mid 1800s by Decimus Burton, who also worked on buildings and gardens at London Zoo and Kew Gardens, which gives you an indication of its visual prowess. In the middle stands a Victorian bandstand, surrounded by deckchairs in the summer. Folkestone has a lot of crummy hotels (read the TripAdvisor reviews of the Grand Burstin Hotel if ever you want a good giggle), but The Grand on the Leas is unarguably beautiful – a century-old building designed to be town’s sunniest spot with towering windows and views looking across the ocean to France. I have fond memories of being treated to a ride in the Grade II-listed Leas Lift, which during the '40s and '50s carried thousands of tourists every day to and from the promenade to the seafront. It was closed in 2016 for health and safety reasons, but there are plans to restore it back to its former glory. If you carry on walking along the seafront you’ll reach the Lower Leas Coastal Park, which boasts the largest free adventure play area in the South East. There’s an amphitheatre that hosts children’s workshops, live music, opera and theatre, some of which are free – Shakespeare’s Winter’s Tale is on the agenda for this summer. The award-winning space offers plenty of picnic tables and picturesque spots to sit with a drink, or there’s the Mermaid Café which sits high above the beach below and has long been reenergising walkers and tired families with paninis, jacket potatoes and big cups of tea. On the other side of town, you’ll find Sunny Sands – a small, but perfectly formed sandy beach overlooked by grassy hills decorated with wild thyme and flowers. Charles Dickens came here to write the first chapters of Little Dorrit and described the view from his window: “The cliff overhanging the sea beach and have the sky and the ocean, as it were, framed before you like a beautiful picture." In fact, he continued, his vista was so pretty that he found himself distracted constantly and barely wrote anything. If you keep walking above the hills, you’ll come to The Warren and the East Cliffs, in which overgrown grassy meadows descend to a usually empty pebbly and sandy beach below. It’s overgrown now, but I like that about it – there’s nothing manicured or polished about this side of town. Steep grassy corridors of foliage and rock sea lavender lead down to the sea and the tiny bays themselves look out across to the White Cliffs of Dover. A rare colony of Grayling butterflies has made the Warren its home. You can swim here, but the water will be freezing so approach with caution. A lot has been said about Folkestone’s rising arts scene. This small coastal town has the largest urban outdoor collection of contemporary art in the UK. The changing exhibition currently consists of 74 artworks by 46 artists, most of which have designed their respective piece with the exact site in mind. Think a treasure hunt of outdoor art and you won’t be far off. There’s Cornelia Parker’s mermaid sculpture, which sits high on the rock above Sunny Sands; under the Harbour Arm’s arches stands Anthony Gormley’s cast-iron human statue, which resolutely stares out to the sea; Lubaina Himid – the first Black woman to ever receive the Turner Prize – created a giant ceramic jelly mould where Folkestone’s former fairground, The Rotunda, used to be; and then there’s my favourite, Richard Woods’ Holiday Home, six colourful, cartoon-like bungalows that are dotted in unusual or unlikely spots around the town – in the middle of the shingle beach, floating in the sea or perched on top of rocks in a carpark – to open a discussion about second homes. The idea is that no site is too small, too unlikely, or too inconvenient for its neighbours, for a holiday home. The fifth Folkestone Triennial, The Plot, arrives from Thursday 22 July – Tuesday 2 November 2021, bringing together over 20 new outdoor artworks. There is an argument that the long-standing locals couldn’t care less about public art, but there is a singular quality about these installations that eludes an art gallery which people often feel intimidated by. Public art is inclusive – whether you decide to engage with it or not is entirely up to the viewer. My favourite way to do Folkestone is to start at the harbour. You could eat at Rocksalt, the town’s Michelin-starred restaurant, but you’d be daft to miss the fresh prawns and crab sticks at seafood stall Chummys. If the weather’s bad, head along the cobbled road and under the railway arch to The Ship Inn for hearty pub food in a warming, cosy setting. The fish and chips are particularly good. Afterwards, walk across the new landscaped walkway to the Harbour Arm – one of Folkestone’s biggest recent success stories and an example of gentrification done respectfully. The Harbour Arm was originally a railway terminal (and also a departure point for soldiers on their way to the Western Front), but remained desolate and unused until five years ago, when it was regenerated. Now, it’s peppered with independent food and drink trucks and stands that span Greek food to excellent flat bread pizzas. Live music is a big part of the activity down on the arm, as the locals call it, and there’s no fee to watch any of it. In the summer, there’s a regular vintage market, where prices feel genuinely affordable, as well as film screenings where two tickets cost only £10. Picnic benches and tables and deckchairs look out across the sea to the majestic White Cliffs of Dover. Yes, there’s the family-run champagne lighthouse at the end of the arm, which plays a mix of reggae, blues and funk vinyl, but the best thing about the Harbour Arm is that people from Folkestone actually use it. There are as many people drinking canned beer and sandwiches bought from Asda in the town centre, as there are DFLs. Everyone is invited to watch the live music, soak up the atmosphere and look out to sea. Once you’ve walked up and down the arm, explore the Old High Street or the ‘Creative Quarter’ as it’s now called, which offers a mix of colourful independent shops, cafes and bars, from record and vintage shops to galleries selling unusual neon artworks. My favourite is Rennies Seaside Modern, a beautifully-curated store which sells furniture, vintage seaside posters, ceramics and textiles by 20th Century British artists. Its owners, Paul and Karen Rennie, have such in-depth knowledge and a contagious enthusiasm for every single item in their shop. You won’t want to leave this tiny cabin of unique curiosities. It’s a steep hill up the Old High Street, but a pretty one – each of the buildings are painted different colours – and a lot of the cafes and bars double up as performance spaces that host talks, workshops and gigs. Keep on walking until you come to Church St. Relative culinary newcomer Folkestone Wine Company has received positive reviews from the critics (and also from my grandad, who loved the food, even if he didn’t understand why the plates were mismatched), and The Pullman next door offers that rare thing of being a pub that works just as well in the summer as the winter – its garden and the terrace is pleasant during the warmer months and a seat by the open fire is warming beyond autumn. As nice as the Pullman is, I still prefer the British Lion which is about two minutes’ walk away in a picturesque, secluded spot called The Bayle. The British Lion is thought to be the oldest pub in Folkestone with parts going back to the 1500s and was a favourite of Dickens' when he visited. It’s a snug, welcoming place that locals love and is decorated with dried hops that hang from the beams. End your day here with a pint at the bar or hunker down in one of the booths. Perhaps part of the reason I love Folkestone so much is that it’s where I first fell in love as young teenager. It makes me happy because it reminds me of a time when I was madly happy – that unique form of mad happy that only happens with intense, first love. I remember my first kiss in the then-dilapidated Silver Screen Cinema and long days spent at the Warren or Sunny Sands usually slightly cold and damp but never minding much. I remember listening to garage compilations in his room recorded off the radio and running through town singing them. I remember proms in run-down venues wearing dresses bought on sale at TK Maxx. Maybe I’ve looked at this grumpy little town with rose-tinted glasses ever since. It’s not as uninviting as it used to be, but it’s as genuine and hardy as ever. Folkestone, you’re all that and a bag of very nice chips.

Lokalne preporuke

Kretanje gradom

Trains

Folkestone has two train stations, Central and West. The apartment is located between the two stations which are both about a 12-15 minute walk away. Trains either go to London or Ramsgate. Change at Ashford for Canterbury and Hastings.
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Taxis

There is no Uber coverage in Folkestone. The main taxi firms are: Folkestone Taxis - 01303 252000 Channel Cars - 01303 252252 JJs Taxis - 01303 244442 Premier Taxis - 01303 270000
Kretanje gradom

Channel Tunnel

Located outside Cheriton on the M20. The terminal is about a 20 minute drive from the apartment.