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Monique’s guidebook

Monique

Monique’s guidebook

Beach / Seaside
Dymchurch is well known for its glorious beach which attracts many thousands of visitors every year. The sandy beach is quite flat and stretches from north to south for over three miles, and is frequently 'washed' by the tide of the English Channel. Dymchurch beach provides safe sea bathing in the haven of Romney Bay and miles of fine sand to build all the castles you want, play beach sports, have a swim in the sea or just laze around. The beach is very close to all the facilities of Dymchurch village, including cafes, restaurants, pubs and amusements. During the summer months there is a beach manager on hand with help and advice. Dymchurch Beach has been awarded a Certificate of Excellence by Tripadvisor.
Dymchurch Beach
Dymchurch is well known for its glorious beach which attracts many thousands of visitors every year. The sandy beach is quite flat and stretches from north to south for over three miles, and is frequently 'washed' by the tide of the English Channel. Dymchurch beach provides safe sea bathing in the haven of Romney Bay and miles of fine sand to build all the castles you want, play beach sports, have a swim in the sea or just laze around. The beach is very close to all the facilities of Dymchurch village, including cafes, restaurants, pubs and amusements. During the summer months there is a beach manager on hand with help and advice. Dymchurch Beach has been awarded a Certificate of Excellence by Tripadvisor.
Family Fun
Located on the golden sands of Dymchurch it is the perfect spot for a family day out. Dymchurch Amusements promises to be fun for all the family. From Mickey’s Runaway and Rocket Revenge, to the spine-tingling Ghost Train and the Dymchurch Dodgems there really is something for everyone. Also on-site are two amusement arcades, with some of the latest games, as well as a café with an indoor soft-ball play area and a snack bar, selling a wide selection of hot and cold food and drinks as well as ice-cream, which you may choose to enjoy in our outside picnic area.
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Dymchurch Amusement Park
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Located on the golden sands of Dymchurch it is the perfect spot for a family day out. Dymchurch Amusements promises to be fun for all the family. From Mickey’s Runaway and Rocket Revenge, to the spine-tingling Ghost Train and the Dymchurch Dodgems there really is something for everyone. Also on-site are two amusement arcades, with some of the latest games, as well as a café with an indoor soft-ball play area and a snack bar, selling a wide selection of hot and cold food and drinks as well as ice-cream, which you may choose to enjoy in our outside picnic area.
Stretching for 28 miles from Hythe, Kent, to Cliff End in East Sussex, The Royal Military Canal was built between 1804 and 1809 as a defence against invasion by Napoleon – although its guard posts also proved useful in stopping the then-flourishing trade in smuggled goods. The long distance Royal Military Canal Path is an excellent waymarked trail with helpful interpretive panels along the way, while a recent £3.5m restoration of the 7km section from Seabrook to West Hythe Dam means that it now offers a wonderfully easy and relaxing route suitable for walkers, cyclists and disabled users alike, along with bridle paths for horse riding. There are picnic tables and benches all along the canal, while both ends of the canal have free car parks and interpretive panels explaining the importance of the habitat for wildlife – some species found here are national rarities. During the summer months the canal comes alive with patrolling dragonflies and noisy Marsh Frogs and Kingfishers.
Royal Military Canal Rowing Boat Hire
3 Mount St
Stretching for 28 miles from Hythe, Kent, to Cliff End in East Sussex, The Royal Military Canal was built between 1804 and 1809 as a defence against invasion by Napoleon – although its guard posts also proved useful in stopping the then-flourishing trade in smuggled goods. The long distance Royal Military Canal Path is an excellent waymarked trail with helpful interpretive panels along the way, while a recent £3.5m restoration of the 7km section from Seabrook to West Hythe Dam means that it now offers a wonderfully easy and relaxing route suitable for walkers, cyclists and disabled users alike, along with bridle paths for horse riding. There are picnic tables and benches all along the canal, while both ends of the canal have free car parks and interpretive panels explaining the importance of the habitat for wildlife – some species found here are national rarities. During the summer months the canal comes alive with patrolling dragonflies and noisy Marsh Frogs and Kingfishers.
Set over 600 acres, Port Lympne is home to the UK’s most authentic safari experience, The African Experience – 100 acres alive with African animals. Join our safari vehicles to see animals including zebras and giraffes wandering freely then head off on foot around the rest of the park to see the big cats and primates. Visitors to Port Lympne throughout the year are promised a super, natural and epic day out as they explore wooded pathways to discover where the wild things are and see the UK’s largest herd of black rhino, big cats, small cats, primates, western lowland gorillas and more. Visitors can also book additional activities for an extra special day, including bespoke safaris, guided tours, team building activities, keeper experiences and many more. Restaurants and kiosks are located around the park providing a variety of hot and cold snacks. Your day out will include a South American, African and Asian experience / Carnivore Territory / Dinosaur Forest and the Primate Trail.
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Port Lympne (Zoo Park)
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Set over 600 acres, Port Lympne is home to the UK’s most authentic safari experience, The African Experience – 100 acres alive with African animals. Join our safari vehicles to see animals including zebras and giraffes wandering freely then head off on foot around the rest of the park to see the big cats and primates. Visitors to Port Lympne throughout the year are promised a super, natural and epic day out as they explore wooded pathways to discover where the wild things are and see the UK’s largest herd of black rhino, big cats, small cats, primates, western lowland gorillas and more. Visitors can also book additional activities for an extra special day, including bespoke safaris, guided tours, team building activities, keeper experiences and many more. Restaurants and kiosks are located around the park providing a variety of hot and cold snacks. Your day out will include a South American, African and Asian experience / Carnivore Territory / Dinosaur Forest and the Primate Trail.
Sightseeing
Martello Tower No. 24 in Dymchurch High Street was one of 74 towers built along the south coast between 1805 and 1812 to resist the threatened French invasion. Of the 74 Martello Towers built on the Kent and Sussex coast, Martello24 is considered to be the best surviving example, being closest to its original condition and it can be seen as it was when occupied by the military in 1806. It has been restored to its original design and layout with almost all of the original tower still in place. The tower contains almost all of the features of the original design including brickwork, front and parapet doors, window openings, fireplaces, ventilation shafts, the original 24 pounder muzzle-loading cannon on the gun platform, parapet shot lockers, hauling rings, replica gunpowder barrels, and replica 'Brown Bess' muskets.
Dymchurch Martello Tower
Martello Tower No. 24 in Dymchurch High Street was one of 74 towers built along the south coast between 1805 and 1812 to resist the threatened French invasion. Of the 74 Martello Towers built on the Kent and Sussex coast, Martello24 is considered to be the best surviving example, being closest to its original condition and it can be seen as it was when occupied by the military in 1806. It has been restored to its original design and layout with almost all of the original tower still in place. The tower contains almost all of the features of the original design including brickwork, front and parapet doors, window openings, fireplaces, ventilation shafts, the original 24 pounder muzzle-loading cannon on the gun platform, parapet shot lockers, hauling rings, replica gunpowder barrels, and replica 'Brown Bess' muskets.
the largest and best-preserved collection of ancient human skulls and bones in Britain. The collection consists of shelves in four arched bays that contain 1,022 skulls in total, and a single stack of bones and skulls measuring 7.5m in length, 1.8m in width and just over 1.8m in height. The stack of bones was reassembled on its brick base in 1910. Past historians indicated that the collection represents the remains of some 4,000 people, but it is impossible to verify the number of bones in the stack. Our latest estimate is a maximum number of 1,000 skulls in the crypt and the total number of individuals represented as 2,000.
The Crypt at St Leonard's Church Hythe
the largest and best-preserved collection of ancient human skulls and bones in Britain. The collection consists of shelves in four arched bays that contain 1,022 skulls in total, and a single stack of bones and skulls measuring 7.5m in length, 1.8m in width and just over 1.8m in height. The stack of bones was reassembled on its brick base in 1910. Past historians indicated that the collection represents the remains of some 4,000 people, but it is impossible to verify the number of bones in the stack. Our latest estimate is a maximum number of 1,000 skulls in the crypt and the total number of individuals represented as 2,000.
The Romney, Hythe & Dymchurch Railway (RH&DR) is a 15 in (381 mm) gauge light railway in Kent, England, operating steam and internal combustion locomotives. The 13 3⁄4-mile (22.1 km) line runs from the Cinque Port of Hythe via Dymchurch, St. Mary's Bay, New Romney and Romney Sands to Dungeness, close to Dungeness nuclear power station and Dungeness Lighthouse. The railway has featured in several television and radio shows including an episode of the BBC series The Inspector Lynley Mysteries in 2006,[17] Harry Secombe's Highway on 8 September 1991,[18] Michael Bentine's It's a Square World in 1964,[19] BBC's Multicoloured Swapshop (filmed on 20 February 1978)[20] and children's show Rainbow.
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Romney Hythe & Dymchurch Light Railway
2 Littlestone Road
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The Romney, Hythe & Dymchurch Railway (RH&DR) is a 15 in (381 mm) gauge light railway in Kent, England, operating steam and internal combustion locomotives. The 13 3⁄4-mile (22.1 km) line runs from the Cinque Port of Hythe via Dymchurch, St. Mary's Bay, New Romney and Romney Sands to Dungeness, close to Dungeness nuclear power station and Dungeness Lighthouse. The railway has featured in several television and radio shows including an episode of the BBC series The Inspector Lynley Mysteries in 2006,[17] Harry Secombe's Highway on 8 September 1991,[18] Michael Bentine's It's a Square World in 1964,[19] BBC's Multicoloured Swapshop (filmed on 20 February 1978)[20] and children's show Rainbow.
Neighbourhoods
Hythe (/ˈhaɪð/) is a coastal market town on the edge of Romney Marsh, in the district of Folkestone and Hythe on the south coast of Kent. The word Hythe or Hithe is an Old English word meaning haven or landing place. The town has mediaeval and Georgian buildings, as well as a Saxon/Norman church on the hill and a Victorian seafront promenade. Hythe was once defended by two castles, Saltwood and Lympne. The town hall, a former guildhall, was built in 1794, its fireplace designed by the Adam Brothers.[citation needed] Hythe's market once took place in Market Square (now Red Lion Square) close to where there is now a farmers' market every second and fourth Saturday of the month. Hythe has gardening, horse riding, bowling, tennis, cricket, football, squash and sailing clubs. Lord Deedes was once patron of Hythe Civic Society. As an important Cinque Port Hythe once possessed a bustling harbour which, over the course of 300 years, has now disappeared due to silting. Hythe was the central Cinque Port, sitting between Hastings and New Romney to the west and Dover and Sandwich to the east.
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Hythe
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Hythe (/ˈhaɪð/) is a coastal market town on the edge of Romney Marsh, in the district of Folkestone and Hythe on the south coast of Kent. The word Hythe or Hithe is an Old English word meaning haven or landing place. The town has mediaeval and Georgian buildings, as well as a Saxon/Norman church on the hill and a Victorian seafront promenade. Hythe was once defended by two castles, Saltwood and Lympne. The town hall, a former guildhall, was built in 1794, its fireplace designed by the Adam Brothers.[citation needed] Hythe's market once took place in Market Square (now Red Lion Square) close to where there is now a farmers' market every second and fourth Saturday of the month. Hythe has gardening, horse riding, bowling, tennis, cricket, football, squash and sailing clubs. Lord Deedes was once patron of Hythe Civic Society. As an important Cinque Port Hythe once possessed a bustling harbour which, over the course of 300 years, has now disappeared due to silting. Hythe was the central Cinque Port, sitting between Hastings and New Romney to the west and Dover and Sandwich to the east.
Old Romney is a village and civil parish located in the Folkestone and Hythe district of Kent. Old Romney St. Clement is a parish dating back to ancient times and, as the name hints out, commenced the primitive settlement of Romney Marsh. It was, thus, the initial port of Romney which over time, stretched out along the Rother toward the sea with either half being labelled "Old" and "New" Romney. As the port let go the importance of the village of Old Romney dwindled and not long after that, only St. Clement and the settlement were left untouched by the 1600s. The location of the village and civil parish is on an island in the River Rother.
Old Romney
Old Romney is a village and civil parish located in the Folkestone and Hythe district of Kent. Old Romney St. Clement is a parish dating back to ancient times and, as the name hints out, commenced the primitive settlement of Romney Marsh. It was, thus, the initial port of Romney which over time, stretched out along the Rother toward the sea with either half being labelled "Old" and "New" Romney. As the port let go the importance of the village of Old Romney dwindled and not long after that, only St. Clement and the settlement were left untouched by the 1600s. The location of the village and civil parish is on an island in the River Rother.
Sandgate spans 2 & 1/2 kms of Kent coastline between Folkestone and Hythe. It fringes the English Channel and clusters beneath steep wooded slopes. Attractively located between Folkestone and Hythe, the charming coastal village of Sandgate is worth much more than a passing visit. A few minutes journey from both towns by car or bus - or an easy seafront walk or cycle ride - you'll find beaches with long views over the Channel, a High Street famous for antiques and collectables, a wonderful selection of inns and restaurants, including traditional fish and chips, as well as small independent shops. Although small - the parish boundary spans two miles of coast and extends inland up steep wooded hills - Sandgate has a fascinating history which embraces the times of Henry VIII, smugglers, the threat of Napolionic invasion and vital military roles in two world wars. Social reformers and celebrities of literature and the arts have made their home in the village.
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Sandgate
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Sandgate spans 2 & 1/2 kms of Kent coastline between Folkestone and Hythe. It fringes the English Channel and clusters beneath steep wooded slopes. Attractively located between Folkestone and Hythe, the charming coastal village of Sandgate is worth much more than a passing visit. A few minutes journey from both towns by car or bus - or an easy seafront walk or cycle ride - you'll find beaches with long views over the Channel, a High Street famous for antiques and collectables, a wonderful selection of inns and restaurants, including traditional fish and chips, as well as small independent shops. Although small - the parish boundary spans two miles of coast and extends inland up steep wooded hills - Sandgate has a fascinating history which embraces the times of Henry VIII, smugglers, the threat of Napolionic invasion and vital military roles in two world wars. Social reformers and celebrities of literature and the arts have made their home in the village.
Rye's ancient medieval streets are clustered around a sandstone hillside, overlooking the meandering River Rother and Romney Marsh. this relaxed, historic and picturesque little East Sussex town is a wonderful place for a peaceful holiday break. Hundreds of years ago, Rye was surrounded on all sides by water. It formed part of the medieval Cinque Ports with the town's hilltop vantage point useful for detecting and repelling marauding invaders. Today, you can explore cobbled alleys lined with untouched historic buildings – from medieval relics to beautiful Georgian houses. Ypres Tower, built in 1249 to defend the town, is still open for viewing. Rye has managed to retain most of its charm and heritage – as well as a sense of the strange! Walk along Mermaid Street and you'll come across houses with names like “The House Opposite”, or the “House with Two Front Doors”. You can also see the remnants of Rye's smuggling past throughout the 18th and 19th Centuries, with networks of tunnels, secret passages and hidden caves. A long-time favourite with poets, artists and craftspeople, Rye is a unique, stunning and inspirational place for a short break, or a longer holiday.
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Rye
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Rye's ancient medieval streets are clustered around a sandstone hillside, overlooking the meandering River Rother and Romney Marsh. this relaxed, historic and picturesque little East Sussex town is a wonderful place for a peaceful holiday break. Hundreds of years ago, Rye was surrounded on all sides by water. It formed part of the medieval Cinque Ports with the town's hilltop vantage point useful for detecting and repelling marauding invaders. Today, you can explore cobbled alleys lined with untouched historic buildings – from medieval relics to beautiful Georgian houses. Ypres Tower, built in 1249 to defend the town, is still open for viewing. Rye has managed to retain most of its charm and heritage – as well as a sense of the strange! Walk along Mermaid Street and you'll come across houses with names like “The House Opposite”, or the “House with Two Front Doors”. You can also see the remnants of Rye's smuggling past throughout the 18th and 19th Centuries, with networks of tunnels, secret passages and hidden caves. A long-time favourite with poets, artists and craftspeople, Rye is a unique, stunning and inspirational place for a short break, or a longer holiday.
Nightlife
Welcome to the first micropub in New Romney and possibly The Marsh itself. Smuggler’s Alehouse is owned by Lance Grist and Neil King, and served its first pint on February 26th, 2016. Smugglers’ is a micropub, which means that the emphasis is firmly on good beer from microbreweries, great cider and carefully selected wines. So, come on down and pull up a chair – like the beer, the conversation is free-flowing and always intriguing.
Smugglers Ale House
10 High St
Welcome to the first micropub in New Romney and possibly The Marsh itself. Smuggler’s Alehouse is owned by Lance Grist and Neil King, and served its first pint on February 26th, 2016. Smugglers’ is a micropub, which means that the emphasis is firmly on good beer from microbreweries, great cider and carefully selected wines. So, come on down and pull up a chair – like the beer, the conversation is free-flowing and always intriguing.
Nature & Parks
Once part of the estate of a Norman manor, Brockhill Park has a central lake, open grassland and meadows, and all the facilities you need for a family day out, including a picnic area, a new play area for kids and refreshments at the excellent Brockhill Café. The park is rich in wildlife, including marbled white butterflies, green woodpeckers and carpets of snowdrops. It is also a Site of Nature Conservation Interest, and has three distinctive areas to explore: the Deer Paddock is an attractive grassy area featuring trees such as the walnut and the variegated sycamore, while The Lake is a shady oasis for wildlife fringed with overhanging trees, where ducks can be found paddling around its edges. The Valley is the largest area of the park, with Alder trees running along its centre, marking the course of the Brockhill Stream as it wends its way down towards the nearby Royal Military Canal. Brockhill Park’s location and the variety of its landscape make it a great place to walk. The more adventurous could also try the circular walk (link) which starts at Brockhill, and leads you through and along local woods and country lanes. To read more about the park, download the Brockhill site leaflet (PDF, 684k) Outdoor Learning at Brockhill. Brockhill has a fully equipped indoor classroom, an outdoor classroom, and a unique mixture of woodland, wetland and grassland habitats. There is something for all age groups and abilities at this site, with programmes including Geocaching, eco-challenges, stream dipping, wildlife Olympics, the Forest School and much more! For more information contact the East Kent Education Ranger. https://www.kent.gov.uk/__data/assets/pdf_file/0019/3565/Map-of-Brockhill-Country-Park.pdf
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Brockhill Country Park
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Once part of the estate of a Norman manor, Brockhill Park has a central lake, open grassland and meadows, and all the facilities you need for a family day out, including a picnic area, a new play area for kids and refreshments at the excellent Brockhill Café. The park is rich in wildlife, including marbled white butterflies, green woodpeckers and carpets of snowdrops. It is also a Site of Nature Conservation Interest, and has three distinctive areas to explore: the Deer Paddock is an attractive grassy area featuring trees such as the walnut and the variegated sycamore, while The Lake is a shady oasis for wildlife fringed with overhanging trees, where ducks can be found paddling around its edges. The Valley is the largest area of the park, with Alder trees running along its centre, marking the course of the Brockhill Stream as it wends its way down towards the nearby Royal Military Canal. Brockhill Park’s location and the variety of its landscape make it a great place to walk. The more adventurous could also try the circular walk (link) which starts at Brockhill, and leads you through and along local woods and country lanes. To read more about the park, download the Brockhill site leaflet (PDF, 684k) Outdoor Learning at Brockhill. Brockhill has a fully equipped indoor classroom, an outdoor classroom, and a unique mixture of woodland, wetland and grassland habitats. There is something for all age groups and abilities at this site, with programmes including Geocaching, eco-challenges, stream dipping, wildlife Olympics, the Forest School and much more! For more information contact the East Kent Education Ranger. https://www.kent.gov.uk/__data/assets/pdf_file/0019/3565/Map-of-Brockhill-Country-Park.pdf

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