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Larnaca CT

Constantinos
Constantinos
Član od 2019
Constantinos

Larnaca CT

Sightseeing
Larnaka Salt Lake is the second largest salt-lake in Cyprus and measures 2.2 square kilometers. In 1997 it was declared a protected area under Cypriot Law for the Protection and Management of Nature and Wildlife and under the European Habitats Directive. It is a significant Ramsar and Natura 2000 site – one of the most significant biotopes in Europe - and one of the most important habitats in Europe for waterfowl. Located southwest of Larnaka town and east of the villages of Meneou and Dromolaxia, the Salt Lake – known locally as ‘Alyki’ - is actually one of four lakes in Larnaka. Together, with Lake Orphani, Lake Soros and Airport Lake, the lakes collectively cover a total area of 1761 hectares. During the winter, the lake fills with water and is home to migrating birds, including thousands of flamingos that stay between November and March, along with wild ducks and other water or shore fowl that find refuge here on their migratory journeys. The most basic element of the food chain in the lakes’ ecosystem is the small brine shrimp Artemia (Artemia salina), which the other life greatly relies on. When flamingos and other water birds are unable to find the shrimp, they desert the salt lakes and continue their journey by travelling to Lake Akrotiri in Lemesos or south towards Africa. Winding through the lake area is a designated, linear nature trail that is 4 km in length, and leads all the way up to the old aqueduct of Kamares. The various flora of trees, shrubs and flowers is signposted with information along the way, and there are also periodic benches, making the path popular for walkers and joggers. Archaeological finds show that the Salt Lake area and that of the nearby mosque have been inhabited since the Late Bronze Age (2nd century BC). In prehistoric times the Salt Lake was a harbour that served the town, unearthed near where the Hala Sultan Tekkesi mosque stands today. The town was one of the large urban and commercial centres of Cyprus in the Late Bronze Age (1650-1050BC). When the town was abandoned, the estuary silted up and the natural harbour was destroyed. According to legend, the lake's saltiness stems from Agios Lazaros (Saint Lazarus) request of an old woman for food and drink. She refused, claiming her vines had dried up, to which Lazarus replied ‘may your vines be dry and be a salt lake forever more’. A more scientific explanation is that the salt water penetrates the porous rock between the lake and the sea, making the water very salty. Throughout the Middle Ages, salt was so plentiful that it became one of the primary export commodities of Cyprus. Its harvesting and selling were strictly controlled and taxed. Salt was last harvested in 1986.
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Salt Lake view point
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Larnaka Salt Lake is the second largest salt-lake in Cyprus and measures 2.2 square kilometers. In 1997 it was declared a protected area under Cypriot Law for the Protection and Management of Nature and Wildlife and under the European Habitats Directive. It is a significant Ramsar and Natura 2000 site – one of the most significant biotopes in Europe - and one of the most important habitats in Europe for waterfowl. Located southwest of Larnaka town and east of the villages of Meneou and Dromolaxia, the Salt Lake – known locally as ‘Alyki’ - is actually one of four lakes in Larnaka. Together, with Lake Orphani, Lake Soros and Airport Lake, the lakes collectively cover a total area of 1761 hectares. During the winter, the lake fills with water and is home to migrating birds, including thousands of flamingos that stay between November and March, along with wild ducks and other water or shore fowl that find refuge here on their migratory journeys. The most basic element of the food chain in the lakes’ ecosystem is the small brine shrimp Artemia (Artemia salina), which the other life greatly relies on. When flamingos and other water birds are unable to find the shrimp, they desert the salt lakes and continue their journey by travelling to Lake Akrotiri in Lemesos or south towards Africa. Winding through the lake area is a designated, linear nature trail that is 4 km in length, and leads all the way up to the old aqueduct of Kamares. The various flora of trees, shrubs and flowers is signposted with information along the way, and there are also periodic benches, making the path popular for walkers and joggers. Archaeological finds show that the Salt Lake area and that of the nearby mosque have been inhabited since the Late Bronze Age (2nd century BC). In prehistoric times the Salt Lake was a harbour that served the town, unearthed near where the Hala Sultan Tekkesi mosque stands today. The town was one of the large urban and commercial centres of Cyprus in the Late Bronze Age (1650-1050BC). When the town was abandoned, the estuary silted up and the natural harbour was destroyed. According to legend, the lake's saltiness stems from Agios Lazaros (Saint Lazarus) request of an old woman for food and drink. She refused, claiming her vines had dried up, to which Lazarus replied ‘may your vines be dry and be a salt lake forever more’. A more scientific explanation is that the salt water penetrates the porous rock between the lake and the sea, making the water very salty. Throughout the Middle Ages, salt was so plentiful that it became one of the primary export commodities of Cyprus. Its harvesting and selling were strictly controlled and taxed. Salt was last harvested in 1986.
Located in its own square in the town centre, the magnificent stone church of Agios Lazaros is one of the most remarkable examples of Byzantine architecture in Cyprus and lies over the tomb of the saint. Built by Byzantine Emperor Leo VI in the 9th century, the church was restored in the 17th century. Although the three domes and original bell tower of the church were destroyed in the first years during Ottoman rule, the gold-covered iconostasis has survived today and is a superb example of baroque woodcarving. Saint Lazarus came to Cyprus after being resurrected by Jesus. He was ordained as Bishop of Kition by the Apostles Barnabas and Paul and lived in the town for 30 years. His tomb can be seen under the sanctuary. The saint is so revered that a procession is held in his honour eight days before Easter. During the procession, the icon of Saint Lazarus is carried through the streets of Larnaka. Next to the church is the Byzantine Museum, which exhibits important religious icons, artefacts and relics.
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Church of Saint Lazarus
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Located in its own square in the town centre, the magnificent stone church of Agios Lazaros is one of the most remarkable examples of Byzantine architecture in Cyprus and lies over the tomb of the saint. Built by Byzantine Emperor Leo VI in the 9th century, the church was restored in the 17th century. Although the three domes and original bell tower of the church were destroyed in the first years during Ottoman rule, the gold-covered iconostasis has survived today and is a superb example of baroque woodcarving. Saint Lazarus came to Cyprus after being resurrected by Jesus. He was ordained as Bishop of Kition by the Apostles Barnabas and Paul and lived in the town for 30 years. His tomb can be seen under the sanctuary. The saint is so revered that a procession is held in his honour eight days before Easter. During the procession, the icon of Saint Lazarus is carried through the streets of Larnaka. Next to the church is the Byzantine Museum, which exhibits important religious icons, artefacts and relics.
Located at the end of the Foinikoudes promenade, the Medieval Castle of Larnaka (also referred to as Larnaka Fort) is believed to have been originally built during the Middle Ages, and took its present form during Ottoman rule, although there is some contestation regarding its origins. Chronographer Florius Boustronius dates it to the years of Lusignan King James I (1382-1398AD), who built it to protect the harbour of the town. During the same time, the Genovese occupied Famagusta and the Lusignans had to develop another major port for the needs of their kingdom. 18th century sources insist that the castle was built by the Turks in 1625AD, even though a Turkish garrison was stationed there since 1570AD. Other references by travellers confirm that the castle was constructed before 1625. After the end of the Ottoman era in Cyprus, the British converted the fort into a prison and it was used during the first years of their rule. The western chamber of the ground floor in the east was used for the execution of prisoners. The gallows - which must have been constructed in the room - were in use until 1948.
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Larnaca Castle
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Located at the end of the Foinikoudes promenade, the Medieval Castle of Larnaka (also referred to as Larnaka Fort) is believed to have been originally built during the Middle Ages, and took its present form during Ottoman rule, although there is some contestation regarding its origins. Chronographer Florius Boustronius dates it to the years of Lusignan King James I (1382-1398AD), who built it to protect the harbour of the town. During the same time, the Genovese occupied Famagusta and the Lusignans had to develop another major port for the needs of their kingdom. 18th century sources insist that the castle was built by the Turks in 1625AD, even though a Turkish garrison was stationed there since 1570AD. Other references by travellers confirm that the castle was constructed before 1625. After the end of the Ottoman era in Cyprus, the British converted the fort into a prison and it was used during the first years of their rule. The western chamber of the ground floor in the east was used for the execution of prisoners. The gallows - which must have been constructed in the room - were in use until 1948.
Food, Drink, Sun
Located near to the site of Larnaka’s (Larnaca's) old airport, the highly popular Mckenzie Beach is a 1 km long strip with fine sands of varying shades of brown and beige, calm, clear and shallow seawaters, and abundant greenery. Facilities on the beach include toilets, showers, changing rooms, sun beds, umbrellas, dustbins and a host of cafes, bars, restaurants and clubs that line the strip, including some of the island’s top nightspots. Lifeguards with lifesaving equipment and first aid services are stationed at the beach from June - October. Due to the beach’s location, it is ideal for plane spotting, whilst there is also a wide array of water sports on offer along the strip, children’s playgrounds, and outdoor exercise equipment. Concerts are held on the seafront stage throughout the year, whilst arts fairs and stalls are also held along the strip. The main visitor attractions of Larnaka Salt Lake and the Hala Sultan Tekke mosque are nearby. The beach attracts both families and younger crowds during the day, whilst at night it is a premium destination for clubbing. Access to the beach is easy and safe by foot, bike, bus or car, with a large municipal car park servicing the beach, and many entry points with paths and paving leading to the beach and the establishments lining it. The beach also offers disabled access.
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Mackenzie Beach
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Located near to the site of Larnaka’s (Larnaca's) old airport, the highly popular Mckenzie Beach is a 1 km long strip with fine sands of varying shades of brown and beige, calm, clear and shallow seawaters, and abundant greenery. Facilities on the beach include toilets, showers, changing rooms, sun beds, umbrellas, dustbins and a host of cafes, bars, restaurants and clubs that line the strip, including some of the island’s top nightspots. Lifeguards with lifesaving equipment and first aid services are stationed at the beach from June - October. Due to the beach’s location, it is ideal for plane spotting, whilst there is also a wide array of water sports on offer along the strip, children’s playgrounds, and outdoor exercise equipment. Concerts are held on the seafront stage throughout the year, whilst arts fairs and stalls are also held along the strip. The main visitor attractions of Larnaka Salt Lake and the Hala Sultan Tekke mosque are nearby. The beach attracts both families and younger crowds during the day, whilst at night it is a premium destination for clubbing. Access to the beach is easy and safe by foot, bike, bus or car, with a large municipal car park servicing the beach, and many entry points with paths and paving leading to the beach and the establishments lining it. The beach also offers disabled access.
Named after the palm trees that line the most famous area of Larnaca, the Finikoudes promenade is a popular spot for both locals and visitors alike. This 600-metre long stretch of sandy beach has calm, warm and shallow waters, and proximity to the many cafés, bars, restaurants and hotels, make it an ideal family destination. Finikoudes promenade is flanked by the marina with its pier and fishing harbour on the one end, and a second pier and the Medieval Fort at the other. Facilities on the beach include water sport activities, toilets, showers, changing rooms, sun beds, umbrellas as well as benches and abundant greenery. The town’s main shopping centre runs parallel. Lifeguards with lifesaving equipment and first aid services are stationed at the beach from June – October, 10:30 – 18:00. The beach also offers disabled access, including a special wheelchair at the lifeguard tower to help disabled persons enter the sea with assistance from the lifeguards.
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Finikoudes
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Named after the palm trees that line the most famous area of Larnaca, the Finikoudes promenade is a popular spot for both locals and visitors alike. This 600-metre long stretch of sandy beach has calm, warm and shallow waters, and proximity to the many cafés, bars, restaurants and hotels, make it an ideal family destination. Finikoudes promenade is flanked by the marina with its pier and fishing harbour on the one end, and a second pier and the Medieval Fort at the other. Facilities on the beach include water sport activities, toilets, showers, changing rooms, sun beds, umbrellas as well as benches and abundant greenery. The town’s main shopping centre runs parallel. Lifeguards with lifesaving equipment and first aid services are stationed at the beach from June – October, 10:30 – 18:00. The beach also offers disabled access, including a special wheelchair at the lifeguard tower to help disabled persons enter the sea with assistance from the lifeguards.

Lokalne preporuke

Kretanje gradom
Rent a bike! (All seasons)
Even though Larnaca is a small city that you can easily walk it, it would be a nice idea to rent a bicycle and explore some areas like the salt lake bicycle path. Larnaca is generally a 'flat' city so its easy to ride on a bike through the city and enjoy sightseeing and more!
Što ne smijete propustiti
Laiki Geitonia
When the tanning portion of the day is through, head to Laiki Geitonia where you’ll happen upon a cluster of bars and pubs in a rabbit-warren of alleys and lanes. Racks of souvenirs vie for your attention, while parasol-covered tables beckon you over for a cooling drink after a hard day at the beach.
Običaji i kultura
Smile
.. and people will smile back to you!