Prijeđi na sadržaj

Lexie’s guidebook

Lexie

Lexie’s guidebook

Sightseeing
“Canterbury’s past is as rich as it comes” says the latest Lonely Planet guide to Britain. Its world-famous Cathedral was one of medieval Europe’s great places of pilgrimage and learning. And it still has a distinctly cosmopolitan feel. Less than an hour from London, it’s in that corner of England that’s almost touching France. People come here from across the world for world-class heritage, for culture and festivals, to visit and to study, to shop, eat and hang out. The extraordinary Cathedral dominates the medieval streets within the city walls. Among the listed buildings, a boldly modern theatre has been built on the river bank, and an art museum has been restored and doubled in size. To the south is St Martin’s Church, the oldest church in the country, and St Augustine’s Abbey, both part of the Canterbury World Heritage Site. There’s something warm and mellow about this intimate city. Crowds throng around the entrance to the Cathedral and in the busy high street. It’s lively and fun. But it’s also remarkably easy – in a moment – to step off the beaten track into some quiet oasis where you’ll hear nothing but birdsong, and the splash of oars on the narrow, gently flowing River Stour. You may be in a city, but you get a strong sense of being in the Garden of England too. There are riverside gardens and even a cider-making orchard within the city itself. Once one of medieval Europe's great places of pilgrimages, explore the World Heritage Sites, take a punt on the river, and discover the secret gardens of this world-famous cathedral city. Full of history and plenty of vitality from the 21st century, Canterbury may not be particularly big, but it is a must-see city. Canterbury not only contains one of the most outstanding cathedrals in the whole of Europe, but is overflowing with medieval character in every corner. The city invests millions in its thriving tourism industry and is easily explored on foot. As well as being of historical interest, this is also a modern city, full of colour and creativity. One of East Kent's most popular retail destinations can be found in the bustling Whitefriars shopping centre, or alternatively you may choose to enjoy a range of specialist and individual shops along the King's Mile. Canterbury's main tourist attractions and tourism highlights include a variety of guided tours around both the city and the River Stour, with popular choices including the Tourist Guides walking tours led by knowledgeable local guides, the Canterbury Ghost Tour during the evening, the horse-drawn Canterbury Carriages around the Old Town area, and both punting trips and boat cruises along the river. In the very centre of the city, the 'Canterbury Tales' Visitor Attraction is especially popular, celebrating this famous novel and offering a host of information about the city's past. Here, visitors will be able to follow Geoffrey Chauncer and his pilgrims on their journey from London, while both the Marlowe Theatre and the Gulbenkian Theatre also warrant a mention, boasting an extensive calendar of shows and concerts. Those looking for quiet respite and peaceful surroundings will enjoy a visit to the Dane John Gardens and Westgate Gardens, where the seasonal flowers, mature trees and outdoor events are amongst the main features. . Historical landmarks can be found all over the city and are always popular with visiting tourists. The highlights include the remains of Canterbury Castle, the 12th-century Eastbridge Hospital, and the row of historic Tudor-style Weavers' Houses, next to the river and St. Peter's Street. Of course, no trip to the city is complete without a visit to the simply breathtaking Canterbury Cathedral itself, which dominates the area with its three towers and immense presence. Nearby, St. Martin's Church and St. Augustine's Abbey are also important parts of this World Heritage Site. View of the River StourSome of the main museums and art galleries in Canterbury' include the Museum of Canterbury, which is full of local artefacts and historical information, while the adjacent Rupert Bear Museum is especially popular with families and those remembering their youth. Other noteworthy museums include the Roman Museum and its impressive collection of ancient Roman treasures, the West Gate Towers complete with its war memorabilia and superb views of central Canterbury, and the Royal Museum and Art Gallery, which is full of quality paintings and fine art.
105
preporuka/e lokalaca
Canterbury
105
preporuka/e lokalaca
“Canterbury’s past is as rich as it comes” says the latest Lonely Planet guide to Britain. Its world-famous Cathedral was one of medieval Europe’s great places of pilgrimage and learning. And it still has a distinctly cosmopolitan feel. Less than an hour from London, it’s in that corner of England that’s almost touching France. People come here from across the world for world-class heritage, for culture and festivals, to visit and to study, to shop, eat and hang out. The extraordinary Cathedral dominates the medieval streets within the city walls. Among the listed buildings, a boldly modern theatre has been built on the river bank, and an art museum has been restored and doubled in size. To the south is St Martin’s Church, the oldest church in the country, and St Augustine’s Abbey, both part of the Canterbury World Heritage Site. There’s something warm and mellow about this intimate city. Crowds throng around the entrance to the Cathedral and in the busy high street. It’s lively and fun. But it’s also remarkably easy – in a moment – to step off the beaten track into some quiet oasis where you’ll hear nothing but birdsong, and the splash of oars on the narrow, gently flowing River Stour. You may be in a city, but you get a strong sense of being in the Garden of England too. There are riverside gardens and even a cider-making orchard within the city itself. Once one of medieval Europe's great places of pilgrimages, explore the World Heritage Sites, take a punt on the river, and discover the secret gardens of this world-famous cathedral city. Full of history and plenty of vitality from the 21st century, Canterbury may not be particularly big, but it is a must-see city. Canterbury not only contains one of the most outstanding cathedrals in the whole of Europe, but is overflowing with medieval character in every corner. The city invests millions in its thriving tourism industry and is easily explored on foot. As well as being of historical interest, this is also a modern city, full of colour and creativity. One of East Kent's most popular retail destinations can be found in the bustling Whitefriars shopping centre, or alternatively you may choose to enjoy a range of specialist and individual shops along the King's Mile. Canterbury's main tourist attractions and tourism highlights include a variety of guided tours around both the city and the River Stour, with popular choices including the Tourist Guides walking tours led by knowledgeable local guides, the Canterbury Ghost Tour during the evening, the horse-drawn Canterbury Carriages around the Old Town area, and both punting trips and boat cruises along the river. In the very centre of the city, the 'Canterbury Tales' Visitor Attraction is especially popular, celebrating this famous novel and offering a host of information about the city's past. Here, visitors will be able to follow Geoffrey Chauncer and his pilgrims on their journey from London, while both the Marlowe Theatre and the Gulbenkian Theatre also warrant a mention, boasting an extensive calendar of shows and concerts. Those looking for quiet respite and peaceful surroundings will enjoy a visit to the Dane John Gardens and Westgate Gardens, where the seasonal flowers, mature trees and outdoor events are amongst the main features. . Historical landmarks can be found all over the city and are always popular with visiting tourists. The highlights include the remains of Canterbury Castle, the 12th-century Eastbridge Hospital, and the row of historic Tudor-style Weavers' Houses, next to the river and St. Peter's Street. Of course, no trip to the city is complete without a visit to the simply breathtaking Canterbury Cathedral itself, which dominates the area with its three towers and immense presence. Nearby, St. Martin's Church and St. Augustine's Abbey are also important parts of this World Heritage Site. View of the River StourSome of the main museums and art galleries in Canterbury' include the Museum of Canterbury, which is full of local artefacts and historical information, while the adjacent Rupert Bear Museum is especially popular with families and those remembering their youth. Other noteworthy museums include the Roman Museum and its impressive collection of ancient Roman treasures, the West Gate Towers complete with its war memorabilia and superb views of central Canterbury, and the Royal Museum and Art Gallery, which is full of quality paintings and fine art.
Sat atop the iconic white cliffs, Dover Castle has stood guardian of England’s shores for over 9 centuries. Step inside the Great Tower and witness the grandeur of Henry II’s medieval palace. Explore vividly-recreated rooms filled with colourful furnishings and imagine the world of courtly intrigue and royal ambition. Climb to the rooftop for unmissable views across the English Channel before descending underground through the winding Medieval Tunnels built during and after the Siege of 1216 to protect the castle from attack. Fast forward over 700 years and uncover the vital role Dover Castle played across two world wars. Discover the Port War Signal Station from which crucial wartime communications were relayed, and find out how the Straits of Dover were defended from the recreated Fire Command Post. Outside, see the castle’s 3” anti-aircraft gun, the only working example of just six left in the world. There are over 80 acres of castle grounds to explore too. Walk the battlements and mighty defences as you stretch your legs and imagination at England’s greatest fortress. Step through the portcullis of Dover Castle and you and your little historians will have the chance to soak up centuries of history, from Romans to the Second World War! Learn of the medieval history of the Great Tower, ascend to the Royal Throne, become the King of the Castle at the very top (don't forget to look out across the Channel to France) and let little legs run free and conquer 80 acres of grounds! What happens when those little legs get tired? We recommend hopping on board the land train, before exploring secret tunnels through the White Cliffs - how's that for an explorer's day out? Please remember to pre-book tickets in advance
103
preporuka/e lokalaca
Dover Castle
103
preporuka/e lokalaca
Sat atop the iconic white cliffs, Dover Castle has stood guardian of England’s shores for over 9 centuries. Step inside the Great Tower and witness the grandeur of Henry II’s medieval palace. Explore vividly-recreated rooms filled with colourful furnishings and imagine the world of courtly intrigue and royal ambition. Climb to the rooftop for unmissable views across the English Channel before descending underground through the winding Medieval Tunnels built during and after the Siege of 1216 to protect the castle from attack. Fast forward over 700 years and uncover the vital role Dover Castle played across two world wars. Discover the Port War Signal Station from which crucial wartime communications were relayed, and find out how the Straits of Dover were defended from the recreated Fire Command Post. Outside, see the castle’s 3” anti-aircraft gun, the only working example of just six left in the world. There are over 80 acres of castle grounds to explore too. Walk the battlements and mighty defences as you stretch your legs and imagination at England’s greatest fortress. Step through the portcullis of Dover Castle and you and your little historians will have the chance to soak up centuries of history, from Romans to the Second World War! Learn of the medieval history of the Great Tower, ascend to the Royal Throne, become the King of the Castle at the very top (don't forget to look out across the Channel to France) and let little legs run free and conquer 80 acres of grounds! What happens when those little legs get tired? We recommend hopping on board the land train, before exploring secret tunnels through the White Cliffs - how's that for an explorer's day out? Please remember to pre-book tickets in advance
Explore over eight acres of award-winning gardens, situated in the grounds of a picturesque coastal castle with a fascinating history. Walmer Castle was once a Tudor artillery fortress that became a stately-home for the Lords Warden of the Cinque Ports, including the Iron Duke of Wellington. Discover a glorious mix of formal and informal garden styles. Admire the herbaceous borders, colourful planting and impressive cloud hedge in the striking Broadwalk or relax in the tranquil setting of the Queen Mother’s garden. See the kitchen garden bursting with fresh fruit and vegetables then stroll through the wild flower meadows and shady woodland walk to the recently-restored sunken glen. With a mix of colourful displays and cool shaded spots, the gardens at Walmer Castle provide the perfect setting for a day out in the fresh air.
26
preporuka/e lokalaca
Walmer Castle and Gardens
26
preporuka/e lokalaca
Explore over eight acres of award-winning gardens, situated in the grounds of a picturesque coastal castle with a fascinating history. Walmer Castle was once a Tudor artillery fortress that became a stately-home for the Lords Warden of the Cinque Ports, including the Iron Duke of Wellington. Discover a glorious mix of formal and informal garden styles. Admire the herbaceous borders, colourful planting and impressive cloud hedge in the striking Broadwalk or relax in the tranquil setting of the Queen Mother’s garden. See the kitchen garden bursting with fresh fruit and vegetables then stroll through the wild flower meadows and shady woodland walk to the recently-restored sunken glen. With a mix of colourful displays and cool shaded spots, the gardens at Walmer Castle provide the perfect setting for a day out in the fresh air.
Closed until January 2021
134
preporuka/e lokalaca
Turner Contemporary
134
preporuka/e lokalaca
Closed until January 2021
There's a reason the Romney, Hythe & Dymchurch Railway is one of Kent’s top attractions, and that's because of the wonder it creates in children. There’s nothing quite like a ride on a heritage railway, and when you combine this with years of steam railway heritage with some of Kent's most picturesque countryside, it's a guaranteed memory maker and a must return experience. The Romney, Hythe & Dymchurch Railway (RH&DR) is a 15 in (381 mm) gauge light railway in Kent, England, operating steam and internal combustion locomotives. The 13 3⁄4-mile (22.1 km) line runs from the Cinque Port of Hythe via Dymchurch, St. Mary's Bay, New Romney and Romney Sands to Dungeness, close to Dungeness nuclear power station and Dungeness Lighthouse.
31
preporuka/e lokalaca
Romney Hythe & Dymchurch Light Railway
2 Littlestone Road
31
preporuka/e lokalaca
There's a reason the Romney, Hythe & Dymchurch Railway is one of Kent’s top attractions, and that's because of the wonder it creates in children. There’s nothing quite like a ride on a heritage railway, and when you combine this with years of steam railway heritage with some of Kent's most picturesque countryside, it's a guaranteed memory maker and a must return experience. The Romney, Hythe & Dymchurch Railway (RH&DR) is a 15 in (381 mm) gauge light railway in Kent, England, operating steam and internal combustion locomotives. The 13 3⁄4-mile (22.1 km) line runs from the Cinque Port of Hythe via Dymchurch, St. Mary's Bay, New Romney and Romney Sands to Dungeness, close to Dungeness nuclear power station and Dungeness Lighthouse.
Canterbury Cathedral in Canterbury, Kent, is one of the oldest and most famous Christian structures in England. It forms part of a World Heritage Site. It is the cathedral of the Archbishop of Canterbury, currently Justin Welby, leader of the Church of England and symbolic leader of the worldwide Anglican Communion. Its formal title is the Cathedral and Metropolitical Church of Christ at Canterbury. Founded in 597, the cathedral was completely rebuilt between 1070 and 1077. The east end was greatly enlarged at the beginning of the 12th century and largely rebuilt in the Gothic style following a fire in 1174, with significant eastward extensions to accommodate the flow of pilgrims visiting the shrine of Thomas Becket, the archbishop who was murdered in the cathedral in 1170. The Norman nave and transepts survived until the late 14th century when they were demolished to make way for the present structures. Before the English Reformation the cathedral was part of a Benedictine monastic community known as Christ Church, Canterbury, as well as being the seat of the archbishop.
103
preporuka/e lokalaca
Canterbury Cathedral
11 The Precincts
103
preporuka/e lokalaca
Canterbury Cathedral in Canterbury, Kent, is one of the oldest and most famous Christian structures in England. It forms part of a World Heritage Site. It is the cathedral of the Archbishop of Canterbury, currently Justin Welby, leader of the Church of England and symbolic leader of the worldwide Anglican Communion. Its formal title is the Cathedral and Metropolitical Church of Christ at Canterbury. Founded in 597, the cathedral was completely rebuilt between 1070 and 1077. The east end was greatly enlarged at the beginning of the 12th century and largely rebuilt in the Gothic style following a fire in 1174, with significant eastward extensions to accommodate the flow of pilgrims visiting the shrine of Thomas Becket, the archbishop who was murdered in the cathedral in 1170. The Norman nave and transepts survived until the late 14th century when they were demolished to make way for the present structures. Before the English Reformation the cathedral was part of a Benedictine monastic community known as Christ Church, Canterbury, as well as being the seat of the archbishop.
Situated just outside the city walls, St. Augustine’s Abbey was originally created as a burial place for the Anglo-Saxon kings of Kent, and is part of the Canterbury World Heritage Site, along with the cathedral and St Martin's Church. Explore the tranquil ruins and discover the rebirth of Christianity in Kent after the departure of the Romans. The Abbey is also the perfect place to walk your dog, or enjoy a family picnic.
11
preporuka/e lokalaca
St Augustine's Abbey
11
preporuka/e lokalaca
Situated just outside the city walls, St. Augustine’s Abbey was originally created as a burial place for the Anglo-Saxon kings of Kent, and is part of the Canterbury World Heritage Site, along with the cathedral and St Martin's Church. Explore the tranquil ruins and discover the rebirth of Christianity in Kent after the departure of the Romans. The Abbey is also the perfect place to walk your dog, or enjoy a family picnic.
Built by the order of King Henry VIII, Deal Castle is one of the finest Tudor artillery castles in England, and a must see on your visit to the quirky seaside town of Deal. Explore the castle from the storerooms and tunnels below up to the circular rooms above. An exhibition reveals how Henry’s fears for the safety and security of his realm shaped the country’s defences and his own married life. With displays, children’s activities and fascinating artefacts, the whole family can enjoy the rich and varied history of the castle alongside stories of the people who lived and worked there. If you enjoy cycling, a pleasant cycle path also links Deal and Walmer Castles along the beachfront.
19
preporuka/e lokalaca
Deal Castle
19
preporuka/e lokalaca
Built by the order of King Henry VIII, Deal Castle is one of the finest Tudor artillery castles in England, and a must see on your visit to the quirky seaside town of Deal. Explore the castle from the storerooms and tunnels below up to the circular rooms above. An exhibition reveals how Henry’s fears for the safety and security of his realm shaped the country’s defences and his own married life. With displays, children’s activities and fascinating artefacts, the whole family can enjoy the rich and varied history of the castle alongside stories of the people who lived and worked there. If you enjoy cycling, a pleasant cycle path also links Deal and Walmer Castles along the beachfront.
This is the oldest church in England that has been used continuously as a church since at least the 6th century and possibly since the 4th century under the Romans, as there is much Roman material in its walls. The church sits on the hill overlooking both St Augustine’s Abbey and also the Cathedral (Image 1). This is quite appropriate as together they form the Canterbury World Heritage Site (UNESCO) recording the coming of Christianity to England in AD597. History The church is thought to have been a Roman mortuary chapel before AD400, as the area has produced many Roman burial sites and the Roman road into Canterbury from the Roman port of Richborough passed close by. In the early 8th century Bede wrote in his History that it was here that Queen Bertha went to pray. There are several walls that date from at least her time It was in this church that traditionally Augustine baptized King Ethelbert. What to see: The chancel is the oldest part of the church as evidenced by the many Roman bricks in the south wall (image 3) and a blocked square headed doorway which originally led to a tiny porch, now lost. Foundations to it were found during an excavation in the late 19th century The nave - this part of the building dates from the time of Queen Bertha. After the restoration of the nineteenth century when the walls were stripped of their plaster Caen limestone blocks in the walls as well as re-used Roman bricks can now be seen. See also the Saxon windows, high up on the tower wall, which can be clearly seen. Two blocked doorways on the side walls are also on view. The very fine 900 year old font is thought to have come from the Cathedral, but the stone rings of which it is made up seem to have got muddled up in the move. The huge tablet set on the wall in the tower to Sir John Finch (d.1660) the Speaker of the House of Commons who had to be held down in his seat to get the Petition of Rights passed. In the churchyard are buried many prominent citizens including Cathedral Deans Alford and Payne Smith as well as the city’s most famous artist Thomas Sidney Cooper and also his pupil, Mary Tourtel, the creator of Rupert Bear and Walter Couzens is also buried here. The outside of the south wall is built mostly of Roman bricks and the shallow buttresses are typical of Saxon work.
St Martin's Church, Canterbury
This is the oldest church in England that has been used continuously as a church since at least the 6th century and possibly since the 4th century under the Romans, as there is much Roman material in its walls. The church sits on the hill overlooking both St Augustine’s Abbey and also the Cathedral (Image 1). This is quite appropriate as together they form the Canterbury World Heritage Site (UNESCO) recording the coming of Christianity to England in AD597. History The church is thought to have been a Roman mortuary chapel before AD400, as the area has produced many Roman burial sites and the Roman road into Canterbury from the Roman port of Richborough passed close by. In the early 8th century Bede wrote in his History that it was here that Queen Bertha went to pray. There are several walls that date from at least her time It was in this church that traditionally Augustine baptized King Ethelbert. What to see: The chancel is the oldest part of the church as evidenced by the many Roman bricks in the south wall (image 3) and a blocked square headed doorway which originally led to a tiny porch, now lost. Foundations to it were found during an excavation in the late 19th century The nave - this part of the building dates from the time of Queen Bertha. After the restoration of the nineteenth century when the walls were stripped of their plaster Caen limestone blocks in the walls as well as re-used Roman bricks can now be seen. See also the Saxon windows, high up on the tower wall, which can be clearly seen. Two blocked doorways on the side walls are also on view. The very fine 900 year old font is thought to have come from the Cathedral, but the stone rings of which it is made up seem to have got muddled up in the move. The huge tablet set on the wall in the tower to Sir John Finch (d.1660) the Speaker of the House of Commons who had to be held down in his seat to get the Petition of Rights passed. In the churchyard are buried many prominent citizens including Cathedral Deans Alford and Payne Smith as well as the city’s most famous artist Thomas Sidney Cooper and also his pupil, Mary Tourtel, the creator of Rupert Bear and Walter Couzens is also buried here. The outside of the south wall is built mostly of Roman bricks and the shallow buttresses are typical of Saxon work.
The Tower of London, officially Her Majesty's Royal Palace and Fortress of the Tower of London, is a historic castle on the north bank of the River Thames in central London. It lies within the London Borough of Tower Hamlets, which is separated from the eastern edge of the square mile of the City of London by the open space known as Tower Hill. It was founded towards the end of 1066 as part of the Norman Conquest of England. The White Tower, which gives the entire castle its name, was built by William the Conqueror in 1078 and was a resented symbol of oppression, inflicted upon London by the new ruling elite. The castle was also used as a prison from 1100 (Ranulf Flambard) until 1952 (Kray twins),[3] although that was not its primary purpose. A grand palace early in its history, it served as a royal residence. As a whole, the Tower is a complex of several buildings set within two concentric rings of defensive walls and a moat. There were several phases of expansion, mainly under kings Richard I, Henry III, and Edward I in the 12th and 13th centuries. The general layout established by the late 13th century remains despite later activity on the site. The Tower of London has played a prominent role in English history. It was besieged several times, and controlling it has been important to controlling the country. The Tower has served variously as an armoury, a treasury, a menagerie, the home of the Royal Mint, a public record office, and the home of the Crown Jewels of England. From the early 14th century until the reign of Charles II, a procession would be led from the Tower to Westminster Abbey on the coronation of a monarch. In the absence of the monarch, the Constable of the Tower is in charge of the castle. This was a powerful and trusted position in the medieval period. In the late 15th century, the castle was the prison of the Princes in the Tower. Under the Tudors, the Tower became used less as a royal residence, and despite attempts to refortify and repair the castle, its defensive systems lagged behind developments to deal with artillery. The peak period of the castle's use as a prison was the 16th and 17th centuries, when many figures who had fallen into disgrace, such as Elizabeth I before she became queen, Sir Walter Raleigh, and Elizabeth Throckmorton, were held within its walls. This use has led to the phrase "sent to the Tower". Despite its enduring reputation as a place of torture and death, popularised by 16th-century religious propagandists and 19th-century writers, only seven people were executed within the Tower before the World Wars of the 20th century. Executions were more commonly held on the notorious Tower Hill to the north of the castle, with 112 occurring there over a 400-year period. In the latter half of the 19th century, institutions such as the Royal Mint moved out of the castle to other locations, leaving many buildings empty. Anthony Salvin and John Taylor took the opportunity to restore the Tower to what was felt to be its medieval appearance, clearing out many of the vacant post-medieval structures. In the First and Second World Wars, the Tower was again used as a prison and witnessed the executions of 12 men for espionage. After the Second World War, damage caused during the Blitz was repaired, and the castle reopened to the public. Today, the Tower of London is one of the country's most popular tourist attractions. Under the ceremonial charge of the Constable of the Tower, and operated by the Resident Governor of the Tower of London and Keeper of the Jewel House, the property is cared for by the charity Historic Royal Palaces and is protected as a World Heritage Site.
466
preporuka/e lokalaca
Londonski toranj
466
preporuka/e lokalaca
The Tower of London, officially Her Majesty's Royal Palace and Fortress of the Tower of London, is a historic castle on the north bank of the River Thames in central London. It lies within the London Borough of Tower Hamlets, which is separated from the eastern edge of the square mile of the City of London by the open space known as Tower Hill. It was founded towards the end of 1066 as part of the Norman Conquest of England. The White Tower, which gives the entire castle its name, was built by William the Conqueror in 1078 and was a resented symbol of oppression, inflicted upon London by the new ruling elite. The castle was also used as a prison from 1100 (Ranulf Flambard) until 1952 (Kray twins),[3] although that was not its primary purpose. A grand palace early in its history, it served as a royal residence. As a whole, the Tower is a complex of several buildings set within two concentric rings of defensive walls and a moat. There were several phases of expansion, mainly under kings Richard I, Henry III, and Edward I in the 12th and 13th centuries. The general layout established by the late 13th century remains despite later activity on the site. The Tower of London has played a prominent role in English history. It was besieged several times, and controlling it has been important to controlling the country. The Tower has served variously as an armoury, a treasury, a menagerie, the home of the Royal Mint, a public record office, and the home of the Crown Jewels of England. From the early 14th century until the reign of Charles II, a procession would be led from the Tower to Westminster Abbey on the coronation of a monarch. In the absence of the monarch, the Constable of the Tower is in charge of the castle. This was a powerful and trusted position in the medieval period. In the late 15th century, the castle was the prison of the Princes in the Tower. Under the Tudors, the Tower became used less as a royal residence, and despite attempts to refortify and repair the castle, its defensive systems lagged behind developments to deal with artillery. The peak period of the castle's use as a prison was the 16th and 17th centuries, when many figures who had fallen into disgrace, such as Elizabeth I before she became queen, Sir Walter Raleigh, and Elizabeth Throckmorton, were held within its walls. This use has led to the phrase "sent to the Tower". Despite its enduring reputation as a place of torture and death, popularised by 16th-century religious propagandists and 19th-century writers, only seven people were executed within the Tower before the World Wars of the 20th century. Executions were more commonly held on the notorious Tower Hill to the north of the castle, with 112 occurring there over a 400-year period. In the latter half of the 19th century, institutions such as the Royal Mint moved out of the castle to other locations, leaving many buildings empty. Anthony Salvin and John Taylor took the opportunity to restore the Tower to what was felt to be its medieval appearance, clearing out many of the vacant post-medieval structures. In the First and Second World Wars, the Tower was again used as a prison and witnessed the executions of 12 men for espionage. After the Second World War, damage caused during the Blitz was repaired, and the castle reopened to the public. Today, the Tower of London is one of the country's most popular tourist attractions. Under the ceremonial charge of the Constable of the Tower, and operated by the Resident Governor of the Tower of London and Keeper of the Jewel House, the property is cared for by the charity Historic Royal Palaces and is protected as a World Heritage Site.
Richborough Castle contains the ruins of a Roman Saxon Shore fort, collectively known as Richborough Fort or Richborough Roman Fort. It is situated in Richborough near Sandwich, Kent, in the United Kingdom. Rutupiae or Portus Ritupis was founded by the Romans after their invasion of Britain in AD 43. Because of its position near the mouth of the Stour, Rutupiae was the major British port under the Romans and the starting point for the road now known as Watling Street. Additional routes connected Durovernum with further ports at Dubris, Lemanis, and Regulbium. Earth fortifications were first dug on the site in the 1st century, probably as a storage depot and bridgehead for the Roman army.
8
preporuka/e lokalaca
Richborough Roman Fort And Amphitheatre
8
preporuka/e lokalaca
Richborough Castle contains the ruins of a Roman Saxon Shore fort, collectively known as Richborough Fort or Richborough Roman Fort. It is situated in Richborough near Sandwich, Kent, in the United Kingdom. Rutupiae or Portus Ritupis was founded by the Romans after their invasion of Britain in AD 43. Because of its position near the mouth of the Stour, Rutupiae was the major British port under the Romans and the starting point for the road now known as Watling Street. Additional routes connected Durovernum with further ports at Dubris, Lemanis, and Regulbium. Earth fortifications were first dug on the site in the 1st century, probably as a storage depot and bridgehead for the Roman army.
Food scene
Local, quick walk from the cottage
The White Horse Inn
53 High St
Local, quick walk from the cottage
Local, moments from the cottage
The Red Lion Inn
75 High St
Local, moments from the cottage
16
preporuka/e lokalaca
The Pig - at Bridge Place
16
preporuka/e lokalaca
36
preporuka/e lokalaca
Old Folkestone Pier
36
preporuka/e lokalaca
9
preporuka/e lokalaca
The Ambrette
14-15 Beer Cart Lane
9
preporuka/e lokalaca
Excellent chinese
Kudos Restaurant
52 Dover St
Excellent chinese
The Duck Inn
The Granville
13
preporuka/e lokalaca
The Dog at Wingham
13
preporuka/e lokalaca
6
preporuka/e lokalaca
Hythe Bay Seafood Restaurant
6
preporuka/e lokalaca
Mark Sargeant’s Rocksalt restaurant & bar in Folkestone celebrates the finest local produce & the best the British Isles has to offer. Seasonal ingredients are expertly prepared creating classic & contemporary dishes, while daily specials are influenced by the day’s catch, served in a relaxed, informal setting with panoramic harbour views.
39
preporuka/e lokalaca
Rocksalt
4-5 Fishmarket
39
preporuka/e lokalaca
Mark Sargeant’s Rocksalt restaurant & bar in Folkestone celebrates the finest local produce & the best the British Isles has to offer. Seasonal ingredients are expertly prepared creating classic & contemporary dishes, while daily specials are influenced by the day’s catch, served in a relaxed, informal setting with panoramic harbour views.
This place is an exceptional Michelin star restaurant which is without a doubt the best food we have ever had.
7
preporuka/e lokalaca
The Fordwich Arms
7
preporuka/e lokalaca
This place is an exceptional Michelin star restaurant which is without a doubt the best food we have ever had.
Pay a visit to Kent this summer (or any time really) and you have to try our sensational local produce; when it comes to a family break, that’s got to mean ice cream! Made fresh from milk from the neighbouring farm, Solley’s family run Ice Cream Parlour is an absolute treat on your travels! Open for takeaway with card payments, here you’ll find 15 flavours to choose from, ranging from classic vanilla, to Forrero Rocher (just try avoiding that temptation). And if you fancy working up a sweat before sampling, you’ll find plenty of walking trails through the Deal countryside – the perfect excuse for an extra scoop.
Solley's Ice Cream Parlour
Pay a visit to Kent this summer (or any time really) and you have to try our sensational local produce; when it comes to a family break, that’s got to mean ice cream! Made fresh from milk from the neighbouring farm, Solley’s family run Ice Cream Parlour is an absolute treat on your travels! Open for takeaway with card payments, here you’ll find 15 flavours to choose from, ranging from classic vanilla, to Forrero Rocher (just try avoiding that temptation). And if you fancy working up a sweat before sampling, you’ll find plenty of walking trails through the Deal countryside – the perfect excuse for an extra scoop.
11
preporuka/e lokalaca
Duke William
11
preporuka/e lokalaca
Mama Feelgoods
Independent Pharmacy
4296 Village Centre Court
Tadpole Tearoom
Mermaid Inn
The Black Robin
The Jackdaw Inn
Beaches
A surfer's paradise, Joss Bay is a popular 200 metre long bay, best known as Thanet's best surfing beach. It is surrounded by fields and a golf course, so offers a wide expanse of sand and carefree play. There is plenty of exposed sand when the tide is in, but take care walking, as the beach will get cut off at both ends at high tide.
16
preporuka/e lokalaca
Joss Bay
16
preporuka/e lokalaca
A surfer's paradise, Joss Bay is a popular 200 metre long bay, best known as Thanet's best surfing beach. It is surrounded by fields and a golf course, so offers a wide expanse of sand and carefree play. There is plenty of exposed sand when the tide is in, but take care walking, as the beach will get cut off at both ends at high tide.
Think of a family visit to the beach and you can’t help but imagine piers, ice creams, mini golf and plenty more nostalgic pastimes. And that’s exactly what you’ll find at the beautiful Herne Bay. From crabbing, to fossil hunting and cycling, we have to admit you’ll be hard pushed to fit it all in! For a relaxed afternoon, we love Tankerton Slopes and Swalecliffe, just up the shore from Whitstable. Grassy slopes perfect for picnicking, a gently sloping beach and pastel-perfect beach huts all make for a wonderfully relaxed beachside break.
6
preporuka/e lokalaca
Tankerton
6
preporuka/e lokalaca
Think of a family visit to the beach and you can’t help but imagine piers, ice creams, mini golf and plenty more nostalgic pastimes. And that’s exactly what you’ll find at the beautiful Herne Bay. From crabbing, to fossil hunting and cycling, we have to admit you’ll be hard pushed to fit it all in! For a relaxed afternoon, we love Tankerton Slopes and Swalecliffe, just up the shore from Whitstable. Grassy slopes perfect for picnicking, a gently sloping beach and pastel-perfect beach huts all make for a wonderfully relaxed beachside break.
A popular sand and shingle beach with clean water for swimming. It has good local facilities including toilets, a first aid post, slipway, restaurants and cafes, and shops.
Dymchurch Beach
A popular sand and shingle beach with clean water for swimming. It has good local facilities including toilets, a first aid post, slipway, restaurants and cafes, and shops.
One of our most photographed bays, Botany Bay is famous. This hidden gem offers stunning views of white cliffs and beautiful chalk stacks. When the tide is out, Botany bay is a great location for fossil hunting and exploring rock pools. There is plenty of exposed sand to enjoy when the tide is in, but due to the bay's shape the ends are cut off at high tide. Seasonal lifeguards Cafe/restaurant nearby Public House nearby Toilets (seasonal) First aid point
20
preporuka/e lokalaca
Botany Bay
20
preporuka/e lokalaca
One of our most photographed bays, Botany Bay is famous. This hidden gem offers stunning views of white cliffs and beautiful chalk stacks. When the tide is out, Botany bay is a great location for fossil hunting and exploring rock pools. There is plenty of exposed sand to enjoy when the tide is in, but due to the bay's shape the ends are cut off at high tide. Seasonal lifeguards Cafe/restaurant nearby Public House nearby Toilets (seasonal) First aid point
Family time is all about the coast, but we’re not talking crowded beaches and difficulty parking, we’re talking about long sandy bays, away from the hustle and bustle. The blue flag awarded gem of Leysdown rests on the shores of the Isle of Sheppey and has long been one of our favourites for a family afternoon in the sunshine. With a beautiful flat sandy beach, and plenty of wide open green spaces nearby, it’s easy to see why. And what’s more, as a small, traditional seaside resort, with ice cream shops, it’s the perfect spot to recapture those nostalgic seaside memories.
Leysdown Beach
Family time is all about the coast, but we’re not talking crowded beaches and difficulty parking, we’re talking about long sandy bays, away from the hustle and bustle. The blue flag awarded gem of Leysdown rests on the shores of the Isle of Sheppey and has long been one of our favourites for a family afternoon in the sunshine. With a beautiful flat sandy beach, and plenty of wide open green spaces nearby, it’s easy to see why. And what’s more, as a small, traditional seaside resort, with ice cream shops, it’s the perfect spot to recapture those nostalgic seaside memories.
Seaside quaint towns
With stunning views of the English Channel to enjoy while strolling the Victorian promenade, the historic town of Hythe has plenty to offer. Enjoy a spot of shopping in the unique, independent shops that line the high street; or discover your adventurous side with a host of outdoor activities including sailing, windsurfing, swimming and golf. The town boasts a beautiful long beachfront that is perfect for a seaside walk, picnic or flying kites. Hythe is home to some beautiful hotels, including the Hythe Imperial Hotel and Spa, with stunning views overlooking the beach. Behind it, swathes of parks and greenery lead to the Napoleonic-era Royal Military Canal, which stretches for 28 miles, with cycle and walking routes. Alternatively, during the summer season, hire a rowing boat or enjoy a leisurely trip on an electric cruiser. From beautiful old houses and cottages, to a skull-packed ossuary in the 10th century St Leonard's crypt, Hythe has plenty of interesting historical sights to see. Visitors can ride the one-third size trains on the Romney, Hythe & Dymchurch Railway; a scenic, marsh-side meander across the Romney Marsh to Dungeness, hauled by steam or diesel powered engines. Nearby, the popular destination of Port Lympne Hotel and Reserve is not to be missed, with its stunning scenery, endangered animals and award-winning accommodation. It's a must-see for any visitor to the area and will easily occupy a full day. Saltwood village, just a mile north of Hythe, is home to Saltwood Castle, famed for being the location where the plot was hatched to assassinate Thomas Becket. Although the castle is rarely open to the public, group visits can be arranged. Brockhill Park is also nearby, with everything you need for a family day out. There is a lake, grassland that is home to a herd of deer, a play area, picnic spots and refreshments from the on-site cafe.
14
preporuka/e lokalaca
Hythe
14
preporuka/e lokalaca
With stunning views of the English Channel to enjoy while strolling the Victorian promenade, the historic town of Hythe has plenty to offer. Enjoy a spot of shopping in the unique, independent shops that line the high street; or discover your adventurous side with a host of outdoor activities including sailing, windsurfing, swimming and golf. The town boasts a beautiful long beachfront that is perfect for a seaside walk, picnic or flying kites. Hythe is home to some beautiful hotels, including the Hythe Imperial Hotel and Spa, with stunning views overlooking the beach. Behind it, swathes of parks and greenery lead to the Napoleonic-era Royal Military Canal, which stretches for 28 miles, with cycle and walking routes. Alternatively, during the summer season, hire a rowing boat or enjoy a leisurely trip on an electric cruiser. From beautiful old houses and cottages, to a skull-packed ossuary in the 10th century St Leonard's crypt, Hythe has plenty of interesting historical sights to see. Visitors can ride the one-third size trains on the Romney, Hythe & Dymchurch Railway; a scenic, marsh-side meander across the Romney Marsh to Dungeness, hauled by steam or diesel powered engines. Nearby, the popular destination of Port Lympne Hotel and Reserve is not to be missed, with its stunning scenery, endangered animals and award-winning accommodation. It's a must-see for any visitor to the area and will easily occupy a full day. Saltwood village, just a mile north of Hythe, is home to Saltwood Castle, famed for being the location where the plot was hatched to assassinate Thomas Becket. Although the castle is rarely open to the public, group visits can be arranged. Brockhill Park is also nearby, with everything you need for a family day out. There is a lake, grassland that is home to a herd of deer, a play area, picnic spots and refreshments from the on-site cafe.
34
preporuka/e lokalaca
Sandwich
34
preporuka/e lokalaca
Ramsgate is home to the only Royal Harbour in the UK – given this status by King George IV because he was so impressed with the hospitality he received in our coastal town, and the same is still true today. With one of the warmest climates in the UK, there’s a distinct continental feel in the town. Visitors can soak up the cosmopolitan atmosphere in one of the many waterfront bars, cafes and restaurants and enjoy the beautiful architecture and our famous Harbour Arches with stunning views across the marina. There’s so much to enjoy – relax and explore the eclectic mix of artisan and boutique shops or stroll along our award-winning sandy beaches and shoreline. If you are looking for something more adventurous, why not cycle, canoe or even kitesurf around our stunning chalk cliff coastline, famous the world over.
16
preporuka/e lokalaca
Ramsgate
16
preporuka/e lokalaca
Ramsgate is home to the only Royal Harbour in the UK – given this status by King George IV because he was so impressed with the hospitality he received in our coastal town, and the same is still true today. With one of the warmest climates in the UK, there’s a distinct continental feel in the town. Visitors can soak up the cosmopolitan atmosphere in one of the many waterfront bars, cafes and restaurants and enjoy the beautiful architecture and our famous Harbour Arches with stunning views across the marina. There’s so much to enjoy – relax and explore the eclectic mix of artisan and boutique shops or stroll along our award-winning sandy beaches and shoreline. If you are looking for something more adventurous, why not cycle, canoe or even kitesurf around our stunning chalk cliff coastline, famous the world over.
Here at the very edge of the Garden of England, three Georgian and Victorian resorts, each with its own distinctive character – Margate, Broadstairs and Ramsgate – cluster around the bays at the far end of the peninsula. There’s a retro feel to these harbour towns, miles of low chalk cliffs edge the peninsula, sheltering a string of secluded, unspoilt sandy bays. For the ultimate experience, you can cycle or hike on the Viking Coastal Trail, along a stunning shoreline and through tranquil lanes. From traditional holiday-town charm, a world-class art gallery, sandy beaches, a cool café culture and tempting retro shops. Margate – ‘The Original Seaside’, is waiting to welcome you The internationally-acclaimed Turner Contemporary gallery named after JMW Turner showcases historical and ultra-modern art work. Take a walk along the Harbour Arm for stylish spots to eat and drink, and watch the setting sun that inspired many of Turner’s artworks. Dreamland, the great British seaside amusement experience with historic rides, classic side shows, and eateries offers an exciting calendar of festivals and events. Margate's Old Town rejoices in a cultural vibe - chic eateries, galleries and vintage shops mixed with traditional seaside delights. Margate Museum, tells the history of sea-bathing and day-trippers whilst the Tudor House, is thought to be the home of a wealthy yeoman farmer. From family-holiday nostalgia, to historic sights, Margate's rich history is everywhere. Rediscover childhood toys at the Hornby Visitor Centre, explore the Shell Grotto's subterranean, shell-lined passages or tackle the challenging 18-hole Strokes Adventure Golf For more than 100-years Margate's Winter Gardens has drawn big-name acts, from the Beatles to the Kaiser Chiefs. The town's Theatre Royal is the second-oldest in the country, while the Tom Thumb Theatre is one of the smallest theatres in the world. The events calendar is bursting with art exhibitions, music concerts, theatre performances all waiting to entertain you
38
preporuka/e lokalaca
Margate
38
preporuka/e lokalaca
Here at the very edge of the Garden of England, three Georgian and Victorian resorts, each with its own distinctive character – Margate, Broadstairs and Ramsgate – cluster around the bays at the far end of the peninsula. There’s a retro feel to these harbour towns, miles of low chalk cliffs edge the peninsula, sheltering a string of secluded, unspoilt sandy bays. For the ultimate experience, you can cycle or hike on the Viking Coastal Trail, along a stunning shoreline and through tranquil lanes. From traditional holiday-town charm, a world-class art gallery, sandy beaches, a cool café culture and tempting retro shops. Margate – ‘The Original Seaside’, is waiting to welcome you The internationally-acclaimed Turner Contemporary gallery named after JMW Turner showcases historical and ultra-modern art work. Take a walk along the Harbour Arm for stylish spots to eat and drink, and watch the setting sun that inspired many of Turner’s artworks. Dreamland, the great British seaside amusement experience with historic rides, classic side shows, and eateries offers an exciting calendar of festivals and events. Margate's Old Town rejoices in a cultural vibe - chic eateries, galleries and vintage shops mixed with traditional seaside delights. Margate Museum, tells the history of sea-bathing and day-trippers whilst the Tudor House, is thought to be the home of a wealthy yeoman farmer. From family-holiday nostalgia, to historic sights, Margate's rich history is everywhere. Rediscover childhood toys at the Hornby Visitor Centre, explore the Shell Grotto's subterranean, shell-lined passages or tackle the challenging 18-hole Strokes Adventure Golf For more than 100-years Margate's Winter Gardens has drawn big-name acts, from the Beatles to the Kaiser Chiefs. The town's Theatre Royal is the second-oldest in the country, while the Tom Thumb Theatre is one of the smallest theatres in the world. The events calendar is bursting with art exhibitions, music concerts, theatre performances all waiting to entertain you
52
preporuka/e lokalaca
Broadstairs
52
preporuka/e lokalaca
15 minutes away you can find bohemian seaside town of Whitstable, famous for its oysters and shingle beaches. This charming port has been dubbed the Pearl of Kent, and is brimming with seafood restaurants, picturesque lanes, artisanal bakeries, boutique shops and art galleries. Soak up the atmosphere in a welcoming pub such as The Old Neptune on the shingle beach or The Black Dog 'micropub'. The Oyster Festival each July is a fabulous celebration of music, molluscs and much more. Or why not roam one of England's largest ancient woodlands at The Blean or cycle the nostalgia-rich Crab and Winkle Way, a tranquil 7 mile route linking Whitstable with Canterbury? Use your own bike or hire one for the day from Kent Cycle Hire.
70
preporuka/e lokalaca
Whitstable
70
preporuka/e lokalaca
15 minutes away you can find bohemian seaside town of Whitstable, famous for its oysters and shingle beaches. This charming port has been dubbed the Pearl of Kent, and is brimming with seafood restaurants, picturesque lanes, artisanal bakeries, boutique shops and art galleries. Soak up the atmosphere in a welcoming pub such as The Old Neptune on the shingle beach or The Black Dog 'micropub'. The Oyster Festival each July is a fabulous celebration of music, molluscs and much more. Or why not roam one of England's largest ancient woodlands at The Blean or cycle the nostalgia-rich Crab and Winkle Way, a tranquil 7 mile route linking Whitstable with Canterbury? Use your own bike or hire one for the day from Kent Cycle Hire.
10
preporuka/e lokalaca
Herne Bay
10
preporuka/e lokalaca
8
preporuka/e lokalaca
Dymchurch
8
preporuka/e lokalaca
Characterful seaside town of Herne Bay. A hit with visitors since the Victorian era, that legacy lingers in the bandstand, fragrant seafront gardens and distinctive 80ft Clock Tower and a great independent town with a plethora of shops and restaurants. Further east, the Reculver Towers and Roman Fort cling to sandstone cliffs, and the two 12th-century church towers sitting amid the remains of a Roman 'Saxon Shore' fort.
10
preporuka/e lokalaca
Herne Bay
10
preporuka/e lokalaca
Characterful seaside town of Herne Bay. A hit with visitors since the Victorian era, that legacy lingers in the bandstand, fragrant seafront gardens and distinctive 80ft Clock Tower and a great independent town with a plethora of shops and restaurants. Further east, the Reculver Towers and Roman Fort cling to sandstone cliffs, and the two 12th-century church towers sitting amid the remains of a Roman 'Saxon Shore' fort.
Neighborhoods
The picturesque ancient Cinque Port town of Sandwich boasts some of the best-preserved, half-timbered houses in the country. So why not take time to soak up some of the unique medieval atmosphere with a stroll around the Town Trail through narrow winding streets, past Norman churches, and along the old town walls. While here, be sure to ascend the medieval tower of St Peter’s for views across Sandwich. You may like to wander through the Monks Wall Nature Reserve or go nautical with a river trip - upstream to the nearby Roman Fort at Richborough or out to sea past a thriving colony of seals. Wildlife enthusiasts are bound to enjoy a visit to one of the town's nature reserves or the local Sandwich Bird Observatory. For the more adventurous, there are cycle routes through the town and along the nearby coast. And if golf's your bag - there are three links courses close by including Royal St. Georges, home to the 2021 Open and the championship links at Prince's. The fascinating history of this charming town is uncovered in the newly refurbished Guildhall Museum where Sandwich’s very own Magna Carta and Charter of the Forest are on display Summertime is fun time, with regular weekend events such as 'Folk and Ale' and the Sandwich Festival. Check out all the details on www.sandwichevents.org.uk.
34
preporuka/e lokalaca
Sandwich
34
preporuka/e lokalaca
The picturesque ancient Cinque Port town of Sandwich boasts some of the best-preserved, half-timbered houses in the country. So why not take time to soak up some of the unique medieval atmosphere with a stroll around the Town Trail through narrow winding streets, past Norman churches, and along the old town walls. While here, be sure to ascend the medieval tower of St Peter’s for views across Sandwich. You may like to wander through the Monks Wall Nature Reserve or go nautical with a river trip - upstream to the nearby Roman Fort at Richborough or out to sea past a thriving colony of seals. Wildlife enthusiasts are bound to enjoy a visit to one of the town's nature reserves or the local Sandwich Bird Observatory. For the more adventurous, there are cycle routes through the town and along the nearby coast. And if golf's your bag - there are three links courses close by including Royal St. Georges, home to the 2021 Open and the championship links at Prince's. The fascinating history of this charming town is uncovered in the newly refurbished Guildhall Museum where Sandwich’s very own Magna Carta and Charter of the Forest are on display Summertime is fun time, with regular weekend events such as 'Folk and Ale' and the Sandwich Festival. Check out all the details on www.sandwichevents.org.uk.
Product Image Product Image Product Image About Tenterden, known as the ‘Jewel of the Weald’, offers the best of all worlds; fascinating history, a wealth of architecture and excellent shopping - all within everyone’s idea of a typical country town and surrounded by Kent’s tranquil countryside. At its centre are the tree-lined greens that distance you from the world going by. So you can shop at a relaxed pace, browsing in the wide range of shops, from the unique and usual to the familiar and well known. Beautiful gifts, crafts, books and antiques… Tenterden is the place where you are bound to find something special. Tenterden is also a fascinating town to explore. Georgian buildings share the streets with tall Victorian houses and tiny cottages; brick and stucco blend easily alongside traditional Kent tile and weatherboard, creating a timeless air. To find out more visit the town’s museum or take a nostalgic ride back in time on the Kent & East Sussex Railway. Admire the countryside as you steam along to Bodiam Castle then visit the 16th-century half- timbered home of the 19th-century Shakespearean actress Dame Ellen Terry and see the sumptuous display of theatrical mementoes. Then take a tour and tasting at nearby Tenterden Vineyard and relax with a glass of wine.
44
preporuka/e lokalaca
Tenterden
44
preporuka/e lokalaca
Product Image Product Image Product Image About Tenterden, known as the ‘Jewel of the Weald’, offers the best of all worlds; fascinating history, a wealth of architecture and excellent shopping - all within everyone’s idea of a typical country town and surrounded by Kent’s tranquil countryside. At its centre are the tree-lined greens that distance you from the world going by. So you can shop at a relaxed pace, browsing in the wide range of shops, from the unique and usual to the familiar and well known. Beautiful gifts, crafts, books and antiques… Tenterden is the place where you are bound to find something special. Tenterden is also a fascinating town to explore. Georgian buildings share the streets with tall Victorian houses and tiny cottages; brick and stucco blend easily alongside traditional Kent tile and weatherboard, creating a timeless air. To find out more visit the town’s museum or take a nostalgic ride back in time on the Kent & East Sussex Railway. Admire the countryside as you steam along to Bodiam Castle then visit the 16th-century half- timbered home of the 19th-century Shakespearean actress Dame Ellen Terry and see the sumptuous display of theatrical mementoes. Then take a tour and tasting at nearby Tenterden Vineyard and relax with a glass of wine.
5 mins away from Primrose Cottage Visit Canterbury and discover why this beautiful, ancient city is one of the jewels in Kent's crown. The historic city is less than an hour from London by train, and just 10 minutes from some of Kent's beautiful beaches, and is the perfect city break for anyone in the mood for gorgeous medieval streets, great food and drink, and cultural getaway. At the heart of the walled city is the iconic Canterbury Cathedral, parts of which date back to the 11th century. The stunning structure welcomes visitors all year round, who come to gaze at the remarkable architecture and visit the very spot where Archbishop Thomas Becket was murdered in 1170. The cathedral remains a popular pilgrimage site and is an calm oasis in the bohemian city - though you're never far from bustling bar or great restaurant. Along with the Cathedral, nearby St Augustine's Abbey and St Martin's Church form a UNESCO World Heritage Site, so take advantage of one of the many walking trails and a guided tours with Canterbury Guided Walking Tours to fully appreciate the city's extraordinary architecture, boutique shops, malls, and key attractions. Those looking for more things to do in Canterbury can visit the Norman Canterbury Castle or delve into the past at Canterbury Roman Museum. The recently refurbished Beaney House of Art and Knowledge hosts numerous exhibitions, and you won't want to miss a chance to see Canterbury’s hidden gems by boat with the award winning Canterbury Historic River Tours. Plus, with Whitefriars offering plenty of big brands, and the likes of the Kings Mile and the Cathedral Quarter boasting some fantastic independent and boutique shops, it's the perfect spot for a little retail therapy.
105
preporuka/e lokalaca
Canterbury
105
preporuka/e lokalaca
5 mins away from Primrose Cottage Visit Canterbury and discover why this beautiful, ancient city is one of the jewels in Kent's crown. The historic city is less than an hour from London by train, and just 10 minutes from some of Kent's beautiful beaches, and is the perfect city break for anyone in the mood for gorgeous medieval streets, great food and drink, and cultural getaway. At the heart of the walled city is the iconic Canterbury Cathedral, parts of which date back to the 11th century. The stunning structure welcomes visitors all year round, who come to gaze at the remarkable architecture and visit the very spot where Archbishop Thomas Becket was murdered in 1170. The cathedral remains a popular pilgrimage site and is an calm oasis in the bohemian city - though you're never far from bustling bar or great restaurant. Along with the Cathedral, nearby St Augustine's Abbey and St Martin's Church form a UNESCO World Heritage Site, so take advantage of one of the many walking trails and a guided tours with Canterbury Guided Walking Tours to fully appreciate the city's extraordinary architecture, boutique shops, malls, and key attractions. Those looking for more things to do in Canterbury can visit the Norman Canterbury Castle or delve into the past at Canterbury Roman Museum. The recently refurbished Beaney House of Art and Knowledge hosts numerous exhibitions, and you won't want to miss a chance to see Canterbury’s hidden gems by boat with the award winning Canterbury Historic River Tours. Plus, with Whitefriars offering plenty of big brands, and the likes of the Kings Mile and the Cathedral Quarter boasting some fantastic independent and boutique shops, it's the perfect spot for a little retail therapy.
57 mins on the fast train from Canterbury West and you are in London
46
preporuka/e lokalaca
London
46
preporuka/e lokalaca
57 mins on the fast train from Canterbury West and you are in London
Don't miss Deal in Kent with its award-winning high street, mazy smugglers' lanes and independent shops. Buzzing cafes and pubs sit alongside a photogenic seafront that's home to a sweeping pier and quirky maritime clock; the Timeball Tower. Prowl the battlements and captain's quarters at Deal Castle, then visit nearby Walmer Castle - this former command post to the Duke of Wellington even features an original pair of Wellington boots.
26
preporuka/e lokalaca
Deal
26
preporuka/e lokalaca
Don't miss Deal in Kent with its award-winning high street, mazy smugglers' lanes and independent shops. Buzzing cafes and pubs sit alongside a photogenic seafront that's home to a sweeping pier and quirky maritime clock; the Timeball Tower. Prowl the battlements and captain's quarters at Deal Castle, then visit nearby Walmer Castle - this former command post to the Duke of Wellington even features an original pair of Wellington boots.
England's most charismatic chunks of chalk, chic eateries, boutique sleep spots, history-rich ports and prime golf courses, make this a must-see stretch of Kent coast. Find out more at: https://www.whitecliffscountry.org.uk/ Dover Highlights Find out more at: https://www.whitecliffscountry.org.uk/explore/dover The White Cliffs of Dover are iconic. Immortalised in song and film for decades, this spectacular wall of crumbly, creamy chalk stretches for 20 miles. Drink in its craggy beauty on a ferry to Dover or a high speed RIB; on a cliff-backed beach or a cliff-top trail to the South Foreland Lighthouse; the National Trust Visitor Centre and Samphire Hoe make great places to start. The history is so vivid at Dover Castle the past feels more like the present. Overlooking the Port of Dover, this magnificent fortification is alive with vibrant furnishings, every-day artefacts and costumed actors. The audio-visual displays of the castle's Secret Wartime Tunnels evoke an underground hospital and the retreat from Dunkirk. Meanwhile, the Dover Museum provides a new twist on cross-channel ferries: a 3000 year-old, sea-going Bronze Age boat.
12
preporuka/e lokalaca
Dover
12
preporuka/e lokalaca
England's most charismatic chunks of chalk, chic eateries, boutique sleep spots, history-rich ports and prime golf courses, make this a must-see stretch of Kent coast. Find out more at: https://www.whitecliffscountry.org.uk/ Dover Highlights Find out more at: https://www.whitecliffscountry.org.uk/explore/dover The White Cliffs of Dover are iconic. Immortalised in song and film for decades, this spectacular wall of crumbly, creamy chalk stretches for 20 miles. Drink in its craggy beauty on a ferry to Dover or a high speed RIB; on a cliff-backed beach or a cliff-top trail to the South Foreland Lighthouse; the National Trust Visitor Centre and Samphire Hoe make great places to start. The history is so vivid at Dover Castle the past feels more like the present. Overlooking the Port of Dover, this magnificent fortification is alive with vibrant furnishings, every-day artefacts and costumed actors. The audio-visual displays of the castle's Secret Wartime Tunnels evoke an underground hospital and the retreat from Dunkirk. Meanwhile, the Dover Museum provides a new twist on cross-channel ferries: a 3000 year-old, sea-going Bronze Age boat.
Come to the pretty medieval market town of Faversham, roughly halfway between Sittingbourne and Canterbury on the A2, the old Roman road linking Dover with London. The town has evolved to provide visitors and residents a warm welcome and choice of experience and a place to enjoy the fruits and local produce the area is famous for. There are over 300 listed buildings in Faversham, recording its extraordinary industrial past. Today you can browse the range of independent shops, galleries (Creek Creative), inns and tea rooms in the town's historic market place or quay side at Standard Quay. An Historic Welcome Awaits Faversham, recognised as nationally significant by many is mentioned in the Doomsday Book and by the 1900s the area became the centre of the nation's explosives industry and manufactured gunpowder for the battles of Trafalgar and Waterloo. Nearby, Oare Gunpowder Works Country Park gives a fascinating insight into these eras, providing a perfect combination of heritage and nature. Faversham with it's own Charters took part in the national commemoration and celebrations to mark the 800th Anniversary of the sealing of the Magna Carta at Runnymede on 15th June 1215. Faversham Town Council has created a new exhibition space at 12 Market Place , where the Faversham Magna Carta and charters will be available to view in the future.
22
preporuka/e lokalaca
Faversham
22
preporuka/e lokalaca
Come to the pretty medieval market town of Faversham, roughly halfway between Sittingbourne and Canterbury on the A2, the old Roman road linking Dover with London. The town has evolved to provide visitors and residents a warm welcome and choice of experience and a place to enjoy the fruits and local produce the area is famous for. There are over 300 listed buildings in Faversham, recording its extraordinary industrial past. Today you can browse the range of independent shops, galleries (Creek Creative), inns and tea rooms in the town's historic market place or quay side at Standard Quay. An Historic Welcome Awaits Faversham, recognised as nationally significant by many is mentioned in the Doomsday Book and by the 1900s the area became the centre of the nation's explosives industry and manufactured gunpowder for the battles of Trafalgar and Waterloo. Nearby, Oare Gunpowder Works Country Park gives a fascinating insight into these eras, providing a perfect combination of heritage and nature. Faversham with it's own Charters took part in the national commemoration and celebrations to mark the 800th Anniversary of the sealing of the Magna Carta at Runnymede on 15th June 1215. Faversham Town Council has created a new exhibition space at 12 Market Place , where the Faversham Magna Carta and charters will be available to view in the future.
Arts and creative
Folkestone Creative Quarter Creative Folkestone's vibrant Creative Quarter in the heart of Folkestone is the perfect place to explore, with a host of shops, galleries, studios and venues offering music, theatre and entertainment. The Creative Quarter includes some of Folkestone's most historic streets, and is just a short wander from the sea. The Old High Street is a winding, cobbled lane lined with independent shops, galleries and eateries, while Tontine Street is a busy thoroughfare to the centre of the town. It is a fantastic example of creatively-led regeneration and is a destination in its own right, offering opportunities to shop till you drop, feast on exquisite food or simply take in the beauty of the town. Why not stop for a while and enjoy a coffee surrounded by vintage books in Steep Street? Veggie or vegan? Try out Uno Mas' Central American street food and discover why Beanos Vegetarian Café is a local favourite! Love live music with a speciality ale, cider or wine? Then discover Kipp’s Ale House and the Lime Bar Café. For a family meal or night out with friends then the Creative Quarter has something for every palette including Big Boys Fine Burger Company, Blooms and El Cortador Tapas Restaurant. Don't miss the Quarterhouse, a one-stop shop for all things creative, from workshops and shows to festivals, films and talks. And if you find yourself in need of pampering or some time just to indulge yourself, check out the range of wellbeing businesses based in the Creative Quarter, offering everything from acupuncture and aromatherapy to massage and music sessions.
8
preporuka/e lokalaca
The Creative Quarter
8
preporuka/e lokalaca
Folkestone Creative Quarter Creative Folkestone's vibrant Creative Quarter in the heart of Folkestone is the perfect place to explore, with a host of shops, galleries, studios and venues offering music, theatre and entertainment. The Creative Quarter includes some of Folkestone's most historic streets, and is just a short wander from the sea. The Old High Street is a winding, cobbled lane lined with independent shops, galleries and eateries, while Tontine Street is a busy thoroughfare to the centre of the town. It is a fantastic example of creatively-led regeneration and is a destination in its own right, offering opportunities to shop till you drop, feast on exquisite food or simply take in the beauty of the town. Why not stop for a while and enjoy a coffee surrounded by vintage books in Steep Street? Veggie or vegan? Try out Uno Mas' Central American street food and discover why Beanos Vegetarian Café is a local favourite! Love live music with a speciality ale, cider or wine? Then discover Kipp’s Ale House and the Lime Bar Café. For a family meal or night out with friends then the Creative Quarter has something for every palette including Big Boys Fine Burger Company, Blooms and El Cortador Tapas Restaurant. Don't miss the Quarterhouse, a one-stop shop for all things creative, from workshops and shows to festivals, films and talks. And if you find yourself in need of pampering or some time just to indulge yourself, check out the range of wellbeing businesses based in the Creative Quarter, offering everything from acupuncture and aromatherapy to massage and music sessions.
Gulbenkian Theatre
41
preporuka/e lokalaca
The Marlowe
41
preporuka/e lokalaca
Places to visit
Come to the pretty medieval market town of Faversham, roughly halfway between Sittingbourne and Canterbury on the A2, the old Roman road linking Dover with London. The town has evolved to provide visitors and residents a warm welcome and choice of experience and a place to enjoy the fruits and local produce the area is famous for. There are over 300 listed buildings in Faversham, recording its extraordinary industrial past. Today you can browse the range of independent shops, galleries (Creek Creative), inns and tea rooms in the town's historic market place or quay side at Standard Quay. An Historic Welcome Awaits Faversham, recognised as nationally significant by many is mentioned in the Doomsday Book and by the 1900s the area became the centre of the nation's explosives industry and manufactured gunpowder for the battles of Trafalgar and Waterloo. Nearby, Oare Gunpowder Works Country Park gives a fascinating insight into these eras, providing a perfect combination of heritage and nature. Faversham with it's own Charters took part in the national commemoration and celebrations to mark the 800th Anniversary of the sealing of the Magna Carta at Runnymede on 15th June 1215. Faversham Town Council has created a new exhibition space at 12 Market Place , where the Faversham Magna Carta and charters will be available to view in the future. The town is home to Britain's Oldest Brewer - Shepherd Neame, which has been brewing beer since 1698 (however, history suggests that the drink was produced in Faversham for several centuries before that). The Brewery has a Visitors Centre and offers guided tours which include an exciting tasting session. The Fleur de Lis Heritage Centre in Preston Street provides a full history of Faversham from the early Iron Age settlements right up to the vast prosperity of Elizabethan times. Explore the fascinating sites of Faversham whilst being told stories and tales about residents of more than 300 listed buildings located in the town. Faversham Town Walks offer guided 90 minute tours which start at the Fleur de Lis Museum. Bring your camera as Faversham is known for its photogenic townscapes. Pick up a map at the Tourist Information Centre in Preston Street and go on your own adventure, admiring the landscapes of Faversham at your own pace, why not have a look at the many Food Trails on offer?
22
preporuka/e lokalaca
Faversham
22
preporuka/e lokalaca
Come to the pretty medieval market town of Faversham, roughly halfway between Sittingbourne and Canterbury on the A2, the old Roman road linking Dover with London. The town has evolved to provide visitors and residents a warm welcome and choice of experience and a place to enjoy the fruits and local produce the area is famous for. There are over 300 listed buildings in Faversham, recording its extraordinary industrial past. Today you can browse the range of independent shops, galleries (Creek Creative), inns and tea rooms in the town's historic market place or quay side at Standard Quay. An Historic Welcome Awaits Faversham, recognised as nationally significant by many is mentioned in the Doomsday Book and by the 1900s the area became the centre of the nation's explosives industry and manufactured gunpowder for the battles of Trafalgar and Waterloo. Nearby, Oare Gunpowder Works Country Park gives a fascinating insight into these eras, providing a perfect combination of heritage and nature. Faversham with it's own Charters took part in the national commemoration and celebrations to mark the 800th Anniversary of the sealing of the Magna Carta at Runnymede on 15th June 1215. Faversham Town Council has created a new exhibition space at 12 Market Place , where the Faversham Magna Carta and charters will be available to view in the future. The town is home to Britain's Oldest Brewer - Shepherd Neame, which has been brewing beer since 1698 (however, history suggests that the drink was produced in Faversham for several centuries before that). The Brewery has a Visitors Centre and offers guided tours which include an exciting tasting session. The Fleur de Lis Heritage Centre in Preston Street provides a full history of Faversham from the early Iron Age settlements right up to the vast prosperity of Elizabethan times. Explore the fascinating sites of Faversham whilst being told stories and tales about residents of more than 300 listed buildings located in the town. Faversham Town Walks offer guided 90 minute tours which start at the Fleur de Lis Museum. Bring your camera as Faversham is known for its photogenic townscapes. Pick up a map at the Tourist Information Centre in Preston Street and go on your own adventure, admiring the landscapes of Faversham at your own pace, why not have a look at the many Food Trails on offer?
Hever Castle is back and ready for your family fun day out! Take the little ones for a tour around a historic castle (the childhood home of Anne Boleyn!) and let them peek at King Henry VIII’s real-life bedchamber. Once you’re satisfied they’ve had their history lesson, the water maze and play areas are ready for the little ones to go wild! If you're tired of the same old activities, make sure to check out Hever Castle's archery lessons. One to remember for a Sunday afternoon...
63
preporuka/e lokalaca
Hever Castle & Gardens
63
preporuka/e lokalaca
Hever Castle is back and ready for your family fun day out! Take the little ones for a tour around a historic castle (the childhood home of Anne Boleyn!) and let them peek at King Henry VIII’s real-life bedchamber. Once you’re satisfied they’ve had their history lesson, the water maze and play areas are ready for the little ones to go wild! If you're tired of the same old activities, make sure to check out Hever Castle's archery lessons. One to remember for a Sunday afternoon...
The family home of generations of children over the years, Penshurst Place is the ultimate summer destination. With yew hedging, concealed entrances and hidden gates, the gardens are spot on for a game of hide and seek (or for pretending you’ve just stepped on The Secret Garden set). The Stage Garden is another favourite spot, made for budding young actors hoping to step into the spotlight, while the Italian Garden is the perfect place for a family retreat and feeling the grass beneath your feet. For families with a lot of pent up energy, we recommend the adventure playground. Take on obstacles, swings and the high walk, before sampling an ice cream or two, and heading on to the 1km woodland trail, complete with carvings, wildlife, ancient trees and a den building area.
14
preporuka/e lokalaca
Penshurst Place
14
preporuka/e lokalaca
The family home of generations of children over the years, Penshurst Place is the ultimate summer destination. With yew hedging, concealed entrances and hidden gates, the gardens are spot on for a game of hide and seek (or for pretending you’ve just stepped on The Secret Garden set). The Stage Garden is another favourite spot, made for budding young actors hoping to step into the spotlight, while the Italian Garden is the perfect place for a family retreat and feeling the grass beneath your feet. For families with a lot of pent up energy, we recommend the adventure playground. Take on obstacles, swings and the high walk, before sampling an ice cream or two, and heading on to the 1km woodland trail, complete with carvings, wildlife, ancient trees and a den building area.
Set sail on an adventure to the Historic Dockyard Chatham and you’ll be faced with 80 acres and 400 years of history to uncover! Climb aboard for an immersive look back at the age of sail, discover how ships were once designed and built, uncover long hidden objects and treasure recovered from the sea bed and learn the ropes in the heart of the Victorian Ropery. Trust us, with a full day of maritime secrets to be discovered, you won’t be hearing the familiar trill of “I’m bored” from your little sailors any time soon! The Historic Dockyard Chatham is Good To Go. Please remember to book in advance and follow guidelines. Enjoy fantastic savings at the Historic Dockyard with the Kent Pass.
11
preporuka/e lokalaca
The Historic Dockyard, Chatham
11
preporuka/e lokalaca
Set sail on an adventure to the Historic Dockyard Chatham and you’ll be faced with 80 acres and 400 years of history to uncover! Climb aboard for an immersive look back at the age of sail, discover how ships were once designed and built, uncover long hidden objects and treasure recovered from the sea bed and learn the ropes in the heart of the Victorian Ropery. Trust us, with a full day of maritime secrets to be discovered, you won’t be hearing the familiar trill of “I’m bored” from your little sailors any time soon! The Historic Dockyard Chatham is Good To Go. Please remember to book in advance and follow guidelines. Enjoy fantastic savings at the Historic Dockyard with the Kent Pass.
With 180 hectares of parkland, a lake in the centre, and plenty of woodland to explore, you're in for some adventures in this Maidstone favourite. And because mini golf should be a part of any family staycation, we recommend testing your skills on the Dino Golf course! Look out for plenty of dinosaur facts along the way, or look up to the dizzying heights of the Sky Tail for even more thrilling action. With dual level high ropes, built around helping all ages to progress their climbing skills, you'll have a little Tarzan on your hands in no time! Sky Trail and Dino Golf are pre-booking only.
12
preporuka/e lokalaca
Mote Park
12
preporuka/e lokalaca
With 180 hectares of parkland, a lake in the centre, and plenty of woodland to explore, you're in for some adventures in this Maidstone favourite. And because mini golf should be a part of any family staycation, we recommend testing your skills on the Dino Golf course! Look out for plenty of dinosaur facts along the way, or look up to the dizzying heights of the Sky Tail for even more thrilling action. With dual level high ropes, built around helping all ages to progress their climbing skills, you'll have a little Tarzan on your hands in no time! Sky Trail and Dino Golf are pre-booking only.
The White Cliffs of Dover are iconic. Immortalised in song and film for decades, this spectacular wall of crumbly, creamy chalk stretches for 20 miles. Drink in its craggy beauty on a ferry to Dover or a high speed RIB; on a cliff-backed beach or a cliff-top trail to the South Foreland Lighthouse; the National Trust Visitor Centre and Samphire Hoe make great places to start.
12
preporuka/e lokalaca
Dover
12
preporuka/e lokalaca
The White Cliffs of Dover are iconic. Immortalised in song and film for decades, this spectacular wall of crumbly, creamy chalk stretches for 20 miles. Drink in its craggy beauty on a ferry to Dover or a high speed RIB; on a cliff-backed beach or a cliff-top trail to the South Foreland Lighthouse; the National Trust Visitor Centre and Samphire Hoe make great places to start.
Pegwell Bay is a shallow inlet in the English Channel coast astride the estuary of the River Stour north of Sandwich Bay, between Ramsgate and Sandwich in Kent. Part of the bay is a nature reserve, with seashore habitats including mudflats and salt marsh with migrating waders and wildfowl. The public can access the nature reserve via Pegwell Bay Country Park, which is off the A256 Ramsgate to Dover road
6
preporuka/e lokalaca
Pegwell Bay Country Park
6
preporuka/e lokalaca
Pegwell Bay is a shallow inlet in the English Channel coast astride the estuary of the River Stour north of Sandwich Bay, between Ramsgate and Sandwich in Kent. Part of the bay is a nature reserve, with seashore habitats including mudflats and salt marsh with migrating waders and wildfowl. The public can access the nature reserve via Pegwell Bay Country Park, which is off the A256 Ramsgate to Dover road