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Prikazuju se rezultati za sljedeće: „Anglesey”

Anglesey – najzanimljivije aktivnosti

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druge prirodne znamenitosti
“Longest zip wire in Europe, meant to be very fast but quite pricey, however everyone who has done it loved it. Its about 30 mins by car from our annexe”
78lokalne preporuke
Dvorac
“If you've never seen a castle up close, this is your chance ! Walk in and around the walls of Caernarfon Castle. A must.”
44lokalne preporuke
Dvorac
“Caernarfon Castle (Welsh: Castell Caernarfon) – often anglicized as Carnarvon Castle or Caernarvon Castle – is a medieval fortress in Caernarfon, Gwynedd, north-west Wales cared for by Cadw, the Welsh Government's historic environment service. It was a motte-and-bailey castle in the town of Caernarfon from the late 11th century until 1283 when King Edward I of England began replacing it with the current stone structure. The Edwardian town and castle acted as the administrative centre of north Wales and as a result the defences were built on a grand scale. There was a deliberate link with Caernarfon's Roman past and the Roman fort of Segontium is nearby. While the castle was under construction, town walls were built around Caernarfon. The work cost between £20,000 and £25,000 from the start until the end of work in 1330. Despite Caernarfon Castle's external appearance of being mostly complete, the interior buildings no longer survive and many of the building plans were never finished. The town and castle were sacked in 1294 when Madog ap Llywelyn led a rebellion against the English. Caernarfon was recaptured the following year. During the Glyndŵr Rising of 1400–1415, the castle was besieged. When the Tudor dynasty ascended to the English throne in 1485, tensions between the Welsh and English began to diminish and castles were considered less important. As a result, Caernarfon Castle was allowed to fall into a state of disrepair. Despite its dilapidated condition, during the English Civil War Caernarfon Castle was held by Royalists, and was besieged three times by Parliamentarian forces. This was the last time the castle was used in war. Caernarfon Castle was neglected until the 19th century when the state funded repairs. In 1911, Caernarfon Castle was used for the investiture of the Prince of Wales, and again in 1969. It is part of the World Heritage Site "Castles and Town Walls of King Edward in Gwynedd".”
24lokalne preporuke
Dvorac
“Beaumaris Castle (Welsh: Castell Biwmares), in Beaumaris, Anglesey, Wales, was built as part of Edward I's campaign to conquer north Wales after 1282. Plans were probably first made to construct the castle in 1284, but this was delayed due to lack of funds and work only began in 1295 following the Madog ap Llywelyn uprising. A substantial workforce was employed in the initial years under the direction of James of St George. Edward's invasion of Scotland soon diverted funding from the project, however, and work stopped, only recommencing after an invasion scare in 1306. When work finally ceased around 1330 a total of £15,000 had been spent, a huge sum for the period, but the castle remained incomplete. Beaumaris Castle was taken by Welsh forces in 1403 during the rebellion of Owain Glyndŵr, but recaptured by royal forces in 1405. Following the outbreak of the English Civil War in 1642, the castle was held by forces loyal to Charles I, holding out until 1646 when it surrendered to the Parliamentary armies. Despite forming part of a local royalist rebellion in 1648, the castle escaped slighting and was garrisoned by Parliament, but fell into ruin around 1660, eventually forming part of a stately home and park in the 19th century. In the 21st century, the ruined castle is still a tourist attraction. Historian Arnold Taylor described Beaumaris Castle as Britain's "most perfect example of symmetrical concentric planning". The fortification is built of local stone, with a moated outer ward guarded by twelve towers and two gatehouses, overlooked by an inner ward with two large, D-shaped gatehouses and six massive towers. The inner ward was designed to contain ranges of domestic buildings and accommodation able to support two major households. The south gate could be reached by ship, allowing the castle to be directly supplied by sea. UNESCO considers Beaumaris to be one of "the finest examples of late 13th century and early 14th century military architecture in Europe", and it is classed as a World Heritage site.”
24lokalne preporuke
Restoran
$$
“Trendy eatery with great views over the straight specialising in home made pizza and sourdoughs cooked over wood. Always buzzing with a great atmosphere. Booking in advance highly recommended”
28lokalne preporuke
Dvorac
$$
“Penrhyn Castle (Welsh: Castell Penrhyn) is a country house in Llandygai, Bangor, Gwynedd, North Wales, in the form of a Norman castle. It was originally a medieval fortified manor house, founded by Ednyfed Fychan. In 1438, Ioan ap Gruffudd was granted a licence to crenellate and he founded the stone castle and added a tower house. Samuel Wyatt reconstructed the property in the 1780s. The present building was created between about 1822 and 1837 to designs by Thomas Hopper, who expanded and transformed the building beyond recognition. However a spiral staircase from the original property can still be seen, and a vaulted basement and other masonry were incorporated into the new structure. Hopper's client was George Hay Dawkins-Pennant (1764–1840), who had inherited the Penrhyn Estate on the death of his second cousin, The 1st Baron Penrhyn (first creation; 1737–1808), who had made his fortune from slavery in Jamaica and local slate quarries. The eldest of George's two daughters, Juliana, married an aristocratic Grenadier Guard, Edward Gordon Douglas (1800–1886), who, on inheriting the estate on George's death in 1840, adopted the hyphenated surname of Douglas-Pennant. Edward, the grandson of The 14th Earl of Morton, was created The 1st Baron Penrhyn (second creation) in the Peerage of the United Kingdom in 1866. The cost of the construction of this vast "castle" is disputed, and very difficult to work out accurately, as much of the timber came from the family's own forestry, and much of the labour was acquired from within their own workforce at the slate quarry. It cost the Pennant family an estimated £150,000. This is the current equivalent to about £49,500,000. Penrhyn is one of the most admired of the numerous mock castles built in the United Kingdom in the 19th century; Christopher Hussey called it, "the outstanding instance of Norman revival." The castle is a picturesque composition that stretches over 600 feet from a tall donjon containing family rooms, through the main block built around the earlier house, to the service wing and the stables. Penrhyn Castle circa 1880 Penrhyn Castle between 1890 and 1900 Penrhyn Castle in 2011 The carved stonework staircase at Penrhyn It is built in a sombre style which allows it to possess something of the medieval fortress air despite the ground-level drawing room windows. Hopper designed all the principal interiors in a rich but restrained Norman style, with much fine plasterwork and wood and stone carving. The castle also has some specially designed Norman-style furniture, including a one-ton slate bed made for Queen Victoria when she visited in 1859. The 4th Baron Penrhyn died in June 1949, and the castle and estate passed to his niece, Lady Janet Pelham, who, on inheritance, adopted the surname of Douglas-Pennant. In 1951, the castle and 40,000 acres (160 km²) of land were accepted by the treasury in lieu of death duties from Lady Janet. It now belongs to the National Trust and is open to the public. The site received 109,395 visitors in 2017.”
23lokalne preporuke
Pivnica
$$
“The Black Boy Inn offers a warm welcome and good food to those in search of a relaxed and traditionally Welsh experience and environment.”
24lokalne preporuke
Engleski restoran
“If you are happy to go by car, then check out Marram Grass Restaurant. Great food by a Great British Menu finalist Ellis Barrie, all the food locally sourced. (20 minutes by car)”
24lokalne preporuke
park
“Another great day out for the family and children. The park has barefoot trails, trampolining, tree-top walks, sledge runs, roller coaster, river ride, water slide, maze and den building. There are lots of other activities too. ”
16lokalne preporuke
Zoo
“Do you like marine life, then head to Sea zoo, a great day out for all the family”
15lokalne preporuke
Museum
“Fascinating estate of the Anglesey family on the Menai straits. Beautiful gardens and a nice cafe outside. Also houses the incredible Rex Whistler painting. A must. National Trust. Another one you can do on a rainy day.”
14lokalne preporuke
Kazalište
“Theatre // Cinema // Art Space // Work Units // Rehearsal Spaces // Conferencing & Meeting Facilities // Cafe Bar (open 7 days a week) // home to Sbarc-Galeri arts project.”
14lokalne preporuke
Kazalište
“The Pontio centre offers an exciting and unique blend of Arts and Culture, Innovation, Education and Community. Lot's going on, the centre boasts a theatre, cinema, numerous dining areas, and interactive lecture rooms, ”
18lokalne preporuke
Natural Feature
“Spectacular coastline with wonderful beaches, such as Newborough and RedWharf Bay. Interesting old towns and villages. Some lovely walks along coastal paths and old lanes, and ancient Celtic sites.”
7lokalne preporuke
Beach
“Newborough Beach (also known as Traeth Llanddwyn) is a 3½ mile long sandy beach reaching from Llanddwyn Island to Abermenai Point. The shore is mostly fine sand with small amounts of shingle, backed by dunes. Further back are Newborough Forest and the nature reserve of Newborough Warren.”
16lokalne preporuke
Grocery or Supermarket
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“The most convenient supermarket is the Tesco extra in Bangor which is just off the A55 Expressway, it is open 24 hours.”
13lokalne preporuke